Valleys & Mountains of Germany

  • 7 nights
  • Sails from Nuremberg to Düsseldorf
  • Brabant
Reichsburg Castle Cochem

Embark on an enticing cruise adventure across Germany aboard Brabant, savouring the country’s most breathtaking areas of scenic beauty as you sail to a selection of fairytale towns and historic cities. Sit back and enjoy views of the Haßberge Mountains, the Middle Rhine Valley, the Lower Moselle Valley and more; and make the most of your time ashore to uncover a wealth of architectural treasures and authentic medieval marvels.

Bamberg is the first of several rewarding stops to enjoy on this stunning sailing. You’ll be spoilt for choice of highlights to uncover in this beautiful Bavarian town: the cathedral, Neue Residenz Palace and Alte Hofhaltung are among the most impressive. Be on the lookout for the towering hilltop churches too. Continuing on your journey, you will then pass the rolling hills, rural castles, noble palaces and charming towns of the Haßberge Mountains. The following morning you’ll arrive at Würzburg, a thriving hub of lavish Baroque and Rococo architecture. The Würzburg Residenz Palace, which features the largest ceiling fresco in the world, is the main landmark here; while Marienberg Fortress is also well worth a visit. As Würzburg is in the heart of Franconian wine country, there’s nowhere better to sample fine local tipples too. A treasure trove of traditional German gems will then await your discovery in Miltenberg, which is laden with medieval half-timbered architecture.

The next morning Brabant will sail by the ornate castles, picturesque forests, vineyards and medieval towns of the enchanting Middle Rhine Valley, so be sure to take in the views from out on deck. The rest of the day is spent at the famous ‘Deutsches Eck’, in fascinating Koblenz. A collection of incredible monuments and landmarks exhibit this city’s over 2000-year history, such as the ancient Ehrenbreitstein Fortress, the Prussian Electoral Palace and the 13th century Alte Berg. Next your river boat will divert down the Moselle to Cochem, where pretty pastel-coloured waterfront buildings, lush-green vineyards and the imposing Reichsburg Castle present a unique scenic landscape. You’ll take in spectacular scenery on an unforgettable journey through the Lower Moselle Valley too, passing by yet more picturesque vineyards, fortifications and towns. A call into Cologne, renowned for its iconic twin-spired cathedral and remarkable Roman heritage, ensures an enlightening end to your cruise.

Itinerary
Day Destination  
Day 1
  • Nuremberg, Germany
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  • A major commercial city with a distinctly cosmopolitan feel, Nuremberg is today one of Germany’s most vibrant, energetic and endlessly stimulating destinations. Home to an abundance of cultural highlights and exciting attractions, from stylish galleries and museums to trendy bars, cafés and lively markets, as well as a few exciting annual events, Nuremberg offers a taste of modern German life.

    A major commercial city with a distinctly cosmopolitan feel, Nuremberg is today one of Germany’s most vibrant, energetic and endlessly stimulating destinations. Home to an abundance of cultural highlights and exciting attractions, from stylish galleries and museums to trendy bars, cafés and lively markets, as well as a few exciting annual events, Nuremberg offers a taste of modern German life.

    There’s much more to Bavaria’s second largest city than contemporary delights though. While Nuremberg tries it’s best to shake off the shackles of its infamous past, there’s simply no ignoring the city’s diverse – and often damaging – history. With origins dating back to Roman times – the city was once the undeclared capital of the Holy Roman Empire – Nuremberg is a picture book of centuries-old structures, especially in the old town ‘Altstadt’ district. Historic highlights here include the collection of medieval half-timbered houses and gothic churches such as the mid-13th century St Lorenz Cathedral; the 13th century Nassauer Haus; and the city’s most impressive sight, the towering Kaiserberg Imperial Castle.

    No time spent in Nuremberg is complete without examining the city’s importance in World War Two. An icon of the Nazi regime, Nuremberg hosted several of Adolf Hitler’s fanatical propaganda rallies throughout the war before being largely destroyed by Allied bombing raids in 1945; and after the war was chosen as the site of the war crimes tribunal, now known as the Nuremberg Trials. Reichsparteitagsgelände – where the famous black and white images of Nazi supporters hailing Hitler were taken – and the Nuremberg Trials Memorial are both must-visit sites, offering an emotive and unforgettable insight into this remarkable period of the city’s history.

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Day 2
  • Bamberg, Germany
  • Cruising by the Hassberge Mountains, Germany
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  • Bamberg

    Bamberg’s incredible history dates back to Roman times. Once the jewel in the Roman Empire’s crown, the town became its own diocese after the Holy Roman Emperor Henry II made it a family inheritance in 1007, and was a major influence on the introduction of Christianity to Bavaria. By the 13th century prince bishops ruled here, overseeing the town’s development and the construction of many magnificent monuments and buildings. 

    Bamberg’s incredible history dates back to Roman times. Once the jewel in the Roman Empire’s crown, the town became its own diocese after the Holy Roman Emperor Henry II made it a family inheritance in 1007, and was a major influence on the introduction of Christianity to Bavaria. By the 13th century Prince Bishops ruled here, overseeing the town’s development and the construction of many magnificent monuments and buildings.

    Fast forward several centuries and today the beautifully Bavarian town of Bamberg – spread across seven hills where the Main and Regnitz rivers meet – is one of Germany’s most picturesque and beguiling destinations. The town’s entire historic heart is UNESCO-listed in recognition of its fascinating heritage and wonderfully well-preserved medieval streets and structures. Exploring the town centre is like stepping back in time or into a fairytale, with stunning sights to discover with every turn.

    Among Bamburg’s many must-visit sites are the magnificent Romanesque cathedral and the centuries-old churches perched atop the town’s tall hills, including the spectacular Michaelsberg Abbey, the gothic-style Church of Our Lady and St Martin’s Church – Bamburg’s only baroque church. Also not-to-be-missed is the unique Altes Rathaus, perched on a bridge across the Regnitz River; and Neue Residenz, home of the town’s Prince Bishops from the mid-17th century to 1802. Be sure to stop by one of the friendly pubs to sample locally-brewed traditional smoked beer too.  

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  • Cruising by the Hassberge Mountains

    As you sail by Germany’s beautiful Haßberge Mountains you might be surprised to learn that their name roughly translates to ‘Hate Mountains’ in English, so peaceful and pretty are the region’s gently rolling hills and lush-green vineyards. 

    As you sail by Germany’s beautiful Haßberge Mountains you might be surprised to learn that their name roughly translates to ‘Hate Mountains’ in English, so peaceful and pretty are the region’s gently rolling hills and lush-green vineyards.

    Look out for a number of Haßberge’s historical delights as your river boat glides along the River Main, including charming medieval towns, noble palaces, the ruins of centuries-old formidable fortresses and magnificent rural castles.   

Day 3
  • Würzburg, Germany
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  • Although Würzburg’s extensive history, in fact, stretches back over several centuries, very little here pre-dates the Second World War. In 1945 Würzburg was almost completely decimated by an Allied bombing raid which destroyed approximately 90% of the city and razed a number of historic churches, cathedrals and medieval monuments to the ground. Plans were made to leave Würzburg in its battle-scarred state after the war to serve as a reminder of the destruction caused; though thankfully these plans were cancelled and the city was painstakingly rebuilt into the Bavarian gem it is today.

    Although Würzburg’s extensive history in fact stretches back over several centuries, very little here pre-dates the Second World War. In 1945 Würzburg was almost completely decimated by an Allied bombing raid which destroyed approximately 90% of the city and razed a number of historic churches, cathedrals and medieval monuments to the ground. Plans were made to leave Würzburg in its battle-scarred state after the war to serve as a reminder of the destruction caused, though thankfully these plans were cancelled and the city was painstakingly rebuilt into the Bavarian gem it is today.

    Now restored to its resplendent former glory, this scenic city situated on the River Main is one of Germany’s most rewarding and interesting destinations, world-renowned for its exceptional architecture, arts and culture. Wandering the city’s renovated and rejuvenated streets and alleys is always memorable, with impressive sights and attractions to encounter at almost every turn. Among the very best are the imposing Festung Marienberg fortress, which offers fantastic views of the city and the Main; St Kilian Cathedral, the fourth largest Romanesque church in Germany; the extravagant Neumünster church; and multiple museums such as Röntgen Gedächtnisstätte and Museum am Dom. There are plenty of bars, pubs and restaurants serving delicious traditional cuisine and local Franconian wines too.

    The most impressive of the city’s sights though is without doubt Balthasar Neumann’s architectural masterpiece, the Residenz Palace. Originally built in the 18th century, Würzburg’s crowning glory is UNESCO-listed and recognised as one of Germany’s finest and most important examples of Baroque architecture. As stunning internally as it is externally, the ‘castle above all castles’ boasts over 300 rooms spread across three wings, 40 of which are open to the public. Not to be missed is the palace’s spectacular Treppenhaus staircase, which is adorned by the world’s largest fresco.

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Day 4
  • Miltenberg, Germany
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  • Visit charming Miltenberg on a German river cruise and you’ll quickly understand why this quaint Bavarian town is affectionately known as the ‘Pearl of the River Main’. Revered for retaining its scenic beauty and romantic historical charm, Miltenberg is one of only a few German towns not to have been extensively rebuilt after the Second World War, so many of the wonderfully well-preserved streets and structures here are as they were several centuries ago.

    Visit charming Miltenberg on a German river cruise and you will quickly understand why this quaint Bavarian town is affectionately known as the ‘Pearl of the River Main’. Revered for retaining its scenic beauty and romantic historical charm, Miltenberg is one of only a few German towns not to have been extensively rebuilt after the Second World War, so many of the wonderfully well-preserved streets and structures here are as they were several centuries ago.

    Stretched along the banks of the Main and centred on the main street laid by the Romans during the town’s inception, Miltenberg is easy, relaxing and rewarding to explore. While away a couple of hours here and you can encounter a plethora of highlights and delights, from the Old Town district’s magnificent market square and medieval half-timbered houses to Gasthaus Zum Riesen – the oldest guesthouse in Germany – where Barbarossa, Emperor Frederick III, King Ludwig of Bavaria and even Elvis Presley have stayed over the years.

    Don’t miss Miltenberg Castle too. Originally built in the late 12th century and subsequently rebuilt after suffering extensive damage during the Margrave Wars and the Thirty Year War, the castle is now a museum exhibiting a collection of fantastic artwork. From the castle’s 27 metre-high keep you can also enjoy incredible views of the beautiful Main Valley. Also well worth a visit are the Old Town Hall, the old cathedral and the town museum, all of which offer an insight into Miltenberg’s interesting history and heritage.

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Day 5
  • Koblenz, Germany
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  • Situated at the famous ‘Deutsches Eck’ where the Rhine and Moselle rivers meet and the magnificent Hunsrück, Eifel and Westerwald mountain ranges converge, it’s no wonder Koblenz is considered one of the most picturesque cities in Germany. The appeal of Koblenz isn’t just skin-deep however; over 2,000 years of history and an abundance of cultural and historical monuments ensure this ancient city is always a memorable and rewarding stop on a German river cruise.

    Situated at the famous ‘Deutsches Eck’ where the Rhine and Moselle rivers meet and the magnificent Hunsrück, Eifel and Westerwald mountain ranges converge, it’s no wonder Koblenz is considered one of the most picturesque cities in Germany. The appeal of Koblenz isn’t just skin-deep however; over 2,000 years of history and an abundance of cultural and historical monuments ensure this ancient city is always a memorable and rewarding stop on a German river cruise.

    While Koblenz’s beginnings date back to Roman times, the Franks, the French, the Prussians and of course, the Germans have all controlled and heavily influenced the city over the years. Many centuries-old fortifications and castles, impressive palaces and sculpted parks, which offer an insight into Koblenz’s fascinating past, highlight this rich and diverse history. The magnificent 19th century Stolzenfels Castle, watching over the Rhine on the left bank of the river; Alte Berg, the former electoral castle built in the 13th century; the Prussian Electoral Palace, where the Prussian Crown Prince and Kaiser Wilhelm I once resided; and the neo-romantic Prussian Government building are all among the highlights. Also not to be missed is the ancient Ehrenbreitstein Fortress, which can be reached via the Koblenz cable car and offers stunning views of Koblenz and the surrounding river scenery from 118 metres above the city.

    It’s also well worth taking the time to venture into the charming Altstadt district, where pretty squares, ornate churches such as Liebfrauenkirche and St Castor Basilica, and the iconic Vier Türme towers await. In the old town you’ll also find a number of friendly bars and restaurants serving the finest local flavours.

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Day 6
  • Cochem, Germany
  • Cruising Lower Moselle Valley, Germany
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  • Cochem

    Although small, the fairytale-esque German town of Cochem is sure to make a big impression. Situated within the breathtaking Moselle Valley on one of the winding Moselle River’s seemingly endless hairpin bends, Cochem is one of Europe’s most charming and picturesque locations. Sailing here is always simply unforgettable, with views of unspoilt lush-green countryside to enjoy from your river boat; while in the town itself there are plenty of eye-catching sights to discover too. 

    Although small, the fairytale-esque German town of Cochem is sure to make a big impression. Situated within the breathtaking Moselle Valley on one of the winding Moselle River’s seemingly endless hairpin bends, Cochem is amongst Europe’s most charming and picturesque locations. Sailing here is always simply unforgettable, with views of unspoilt lush-green countryside to enjoy from your riverboat, while in the town itself there are plenty of eye-catching sights to discover too.

    Tucked away within the town’s narrow streets and twisting, maze-like alleys you can uncover a jumble of restored and remarkably well-preserved half-timbered houses; remains of the old town walls and fortifications such as the Endert Gate Tower and the Guard House, which date back to the 14th century; and the baroque-style, early-18th century Town Hall. A walk along the Moselle promenade is highly recommended too; while it is also well worth stopping by one of the friendly pubs or restaurants to try Riesling wines which are produced from grapes sourced at nearby vineyards.

    Literally unmissable is the magnificent Reichsburg Castle. Towering above the town atop a 330-foot-high hill, Reichsburg is one of the most iconic and instantly recognisable landmarks seen anywhere on the banks of the Moselle. The climb to this centuries-old structure is steep, but it’s well worth making the effort, if you have time, to admire the castle’s interesting mix of architectural styles, learn more about it’s fascinating history and capture a glimpse of the beautiful surrounding valleys, vineyards and towns.  

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  • Cruising Lower Moselle Valley

    With its beautiful, ever-changing landscape, which is marked by world-famous vineyards, imposing cliffs and steep hills, towering centuries-old castles and a string of postcard-perfect historic towns, the Lower Moselle Valley is widely considered the most picturesque section of the Moselle River. 

    With its beautiful, ever-changing landscape, which is marked by world-famous vineyards, imposing cliffs and steep hills, towering centuries-old castles and a string of postcard-perfect historic towns, the Lower Moselle Valley is widely considered the most picturesque section of the Moselle River.

    Here the river is the much narrower than it is in the Upper and Middle Moselle regions, so you’ll be closer to the spectacular landscapes as your riverboat negotiates the waterway’s many meanders. Have your camera to hand to capture the stunning scenery, or simply sit back and enjoy the view. 

Day 7
  • Cologne, Germany
  • Düsseldorf, Germany
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  • Cologne

    Situated on the Rhine River in the centre of the Rhine-Rhur region, charming Cologne is the beating heart of the beautiful Rhineland. Originally founded over 2,000 years ago by the Ubii tribe, Cologne was once the largest city in the Holy Roman Empire and served as a major trade route throughout the Middle Ages. In recent years the city has been extensively rebuilt and restructured, and is now one of the most important historical and cultural centres in Europe.

    Situated on the Rhine River in the centre of the Rhine-Rhur region, charming Cologne is the beating heart of the beautiful Rhineland. Originally founded over 2,000 years ago by the Ubii tribe, Cologne was once the largest city in the Holy Roman Empire and served as a major trade route throughout the Middle Ages. In recent years the city has been extensively rebuilt and restructured, and is now one of the most important historical and cultural centres in Europe.

    With such a rich history and heritage, Cologne is a picture book of fascinating highlights and experiences. The city’s most iconic site is without doubt the magnificent UNESCO-listed Cathedral, which has long been considered Germany’s single most popular attraction. The soaring gothic spires of this incredible 13th century structure can be seen from all over the city, however visiting the cathedral is a must to marvel at its spectacular architecture up-close and uncover the treasures within.

    The city’s many other must-visit sights and attractions include the impressive Hohenzollern Bridge, which spans the Rhine near the cathedral; a collection of 12 glorious Romanesque churches including St Kunibert, St Severin and St Andreas; the beautiful Forstbotanischer botanical garden; and several galleries and museums such as the Fragrance Museum and Museum Ludwig, which boasts one of the Europe’s finest Picasso collections. For a taste of the local culture – and of the local brew – be sure to stop by Altstadt district, where bustling pubs and beer halls serve the city’s famous sweet pale ale, Kölsch.

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  • Düsseldorf

    Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    At first glimpse of the city you can’t help but be impressed by the sight of Düsseldorf’s landscape-dominating modern marvels. The soaring, 240 metre-high Rhine Tower and the distinctive structures of the MediaHarbor – which is home to the city’s trendiest bars, restaurants, cafés and hotels – are particularly impressive, showcasing the city’s wealth and recent development. Away from the banks of the Rhine there’s much more to discover within the ‘Stadtmitte’ district, such as the bustling, internationally-famous shopping street of Königsallee; the Japanese quarter; and the bustling banking quarter.

    Take time to dig a little deeper and you’ll uncover a plethora of historic highlights in Düsseldorf too. Within the charming Altstadt district – which was almost completely destroyed in World War Two and subsequently rebuilt – you can take in the monuments of Castle Square, including the remains of the baroque palace and the city monument; centuries-old churches such as St Lambertus Basilika and Neanderkirche; the 16th century Rathaus and much more. The Carlstadt district, with its many museums, galleries, markets and collection of pretty baroque-style architecture, is worth a visit too. 

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Day 8
  • Düsseldorf, Germany
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  • Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    At first glimpse of the city you can’t help but be impressed by the sight of Düsseldorf’s landscape-dominating modern marvels. The soaring, 240 metre-high Rhine Tower and the distinctive structures of the MediaHarbor – which is home to the city’s trendiest bars, restaurants, cafés and hotels – are particularly impressive, showcasing the city’s wealth and recent development. Away from the banks of the Rhine there’s much more to discover within the ‘Stadtmitte’ district, such as the bustling, internationally-famous shopping street of Königsallee; the Japanese quarter; and the bustling banking quarter.

    Take time to dig a little deeper and you’ll uncover a plethora of historic highlights in Düsseldorf too. Within the charming Altstadt district – which was almost completely destroyed in World War Two and subsequently rebuilt – you can take in the monuments of Castle Square, including the remains of the baroque palace and the city monument; centuries-old churches such as St Lambertus Basilika and Neanderkirche; the 16th century Rathaus and much more. The Carlstadt district, with its many museums, galleries, markets and collection of pretty baroque-style architecture, is worth a visit too. 

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Dates & Prices
31st May 2018 - R1809
From £1,599 per person
Standard Room on Brabant

Standard Room

In the Standard Rooms on Haydn Deck 1, there’s plenty of room to relax and each is fully equipped with everything you need for a comfortable and enjoyable holiday. Amenities include an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Please note: the windows in the Standard Rooms are positioned high up and cannot be opened and the rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. 

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,599 per person For cruise only deduct £300pp
Juliette Balcony Room Strauss Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Strauss

The spacious Juliette Balcony Rooms on Strauss Deck 2 are approximately 161 sq ft. and offer a generous amount of room for an enjoyable river cruise experience. These rooms also include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, plenty of wardrobe space, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, a flat-screen TV, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,799 per person For cruise only deduct £300pp
Juliette Balcony Room Mozart Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Mozart

The sizable Juliette Balcony Rooms on Mozart Deck 3 offer everything needed for an enjoyable stay. The rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. and facilities include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), plenty of wardrobe space, a flat screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,899 per person For cruise only deduct £300pp
Juliette Balcony Room Suite on Brabant

Juliette Balcony Suite

There are just two Suites on board Brabant, both beautifully furnished and with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. Features include a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Extra benefits include a large comfortable seating area, an en suite bathroom with bathtub and toilet, complimentary bathrobe and a mini-bar (payable). The Juliette Balcony Suites are approximately 236 sq ft.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £2,199 per person For cruise only deduct £300pp
What's Included

Rest assured, all of the following comes as standard on every Fred. Olsen river cruise:

  • Comfortable en suite accommodation with TV, hairdryer, safe and individually controlled air conditioning 
  • Tempting cuisine every day throughout your cruise – with ‘early riser’ breakfast, breakfast buffet, casual lunch, five-course à la carte dinner and late-night snacks
  • Complimentary tea & coffee station 24 hours a day 
  • Complimentary afternoon tea & coffee with sandwiches and cakes 
  • Welcome Cocktail, Welcome Dinner and Captain’s Gala Dinner 
  • Complimentary Wi-Fi 
  • Use of leisure facilities including Fitness Room and Wellness Tub 
  • Lounge music by pianist, or duo every day 
  • All local taxes and port charges (where collectable in advance)
On Our Boat

Built in 2006, this elegant and comfortable vessel is in keeping with the fleet of our ocean-going cruise ships. Brabant’s bright and spacious public areas and 79 well-equipped rooms and suites, spread across four decks, provide the intimate, home-from-home feel which Fred. Olsen’s guests already know and love. Cruise ship staples such as swimming pools, a number of lounges and on-going activities are not in evidence on board, making way for a comfortable ambience and ample space in which to relax and enjoy the river cruise experience with around 150 fellow guests.

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