Springtime Dutch Discovery

  • Selection of dates available
  • 5 nights
  • Sails from Amsterdam to Düsseldorf
  • Brabant
Tulips in bloom Keukenhof
2
sailings
available

If you’ve never experienced river cruising before or only have time spare for a short escape, this relaxing and rewarding cruise from Amsterdam to Düsseldorf is the perfect spring break. You’ll be able to marvel at the seasonal delights of the Dutch capital before taking in the beautifully diverse countryside of the Netherlands and visiting a string of towns and cities steeped in history and authentic culture.

After joining Brabant in Amsterdam, you’ll have the following morning to explore this iconic city before setting sail. The excellent Rijksmuseum, Anne Frank House and the grand architecture lining the famous canals will vie for your attention, however a trip to the resplendent, 32-hectare Keukenhof Gardens is a must at this time of year to see the vibrant tulips in their spectacular spring bloom. Cruising on the Ijsselmeer Lake follows en route to Hoorn. This historic town was a major trading base during the Dutch ‘Golden Age’ and the cosy harbour here harks back to those prosperous times. In the compact town centre seven fascinating museums are within easy reach on foot. You’ll also stop in Kampen for the chance to see centuries-old churches, towers and remains of the ancient city wall in one of the Netherlands’ best-preserved Hanseatic city centres. 

Brabant continues onwards along the Ijssel River, presenting you with views of the beautiful city of Zwolle, several pretty villages and beautiful countryside as you head for Deventer. This city is renowned for its industrial and religious significance, which is showcased by the striking Hanseatic-era architecture and imposing St Lebuin’s Church. The Netherlands’ oldest stone house, oldest scientific library and the oldest park are among Deventer’s ‘must-visit’ highlights too. Your penultimate stop is made at Arnhem – most famous for the Battle of Arnhem during World War Two – after passing by the picturesque city of Zutphen. Just a short distance from Arnhem is the fantastic Netherlands Open Air Museum, which exhibits an impressive collection houses, antiques and monuments from various eras. Historic landmarks such as the gothic-style St Eusebius Church and 12th century Doorwerth Castle are also well worth visiting.
 
On your final day Fort Pannerden will be a sight to behold as you journey along the Pannerden Canal in the morning, before spending the afternoon in Nijmegen. Exploring the Netherlands’ oldest city will round-off your cruise perfectly before you disembark in Düsseldorf. Valkhof Museum is a great place to start before perhaps wandering along the Waalbrug to capture views of the Old Town and the Waal River.

Itinerary
Day Destination  
Day 1
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands
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  • Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Today Amsterdam boasts one of the largest and most beautiful historic centres in Europe. Spread across 90 islands – linked by 400 bridges spanning the city’s iconic canals – the centre is packed with around 7,000 historic buildings, including many which date back to the ‘Golden Age’. Among the most impressive are the Royal Palace, which dominates Dam Square; a number of churches including the 17th century Westerkerk, Amsterdam’s tallest church; and the medieval houses of Begijnhof. Not to be missed is the UNESCO-listed Canal Ring district. Here you’ll see some of the city’s finest houses and grand mansions perched on along the canal sides; as well as traditional white drawbridges. [ReadMore]

    Amsterdam is also home to a collection of incredible museums and galleries, many of which are world-renowned for their cultural, artistic and historical importance. There’s Anne Frank House, where Anne Frank and her family famously hid from the German occupiers in World War Two; Rijksmuseum, exhibiting ‘Golden Age’ paintings by artists such as Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals; the Van Gogh Museum, celebrating the life and works of legendary Vincent Van Gogh; and much more. In the spring and summer months, trips to the Tulip Museum and the Keukenhof Gardens are a must.

    For a little retail therapy Amsterdam’s abundance of shopping streets and busy markets won’t disappoint; while there are plenty of trendy cafés, bars and restaurants dotted around the city too. And of course, the iconic red light district offers a wealth of unique sights and experiences. Simply walking through the area is an experience in itself.

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Day 2
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Cruising Across Ijsselmeer, Netherlands
  • Hoorn, Netherlands
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  • Amsterdam

    Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Today Amsterdam boasts one of the largest and most beautiful historic centres in Europe. Spread across 90 islands – linked by 400 bridges spanning the city’s iconic canals – the centre is packed with around 7,000 historic buildings, including many which date back to the ‘Golden Age’. Among the most impressive are the Royal Palace, which dominates Dam Square; a number of churches including the 17th century Westerkerk, Amsterdam’s tallest church; and the medieval houses of Begijnhof. Not to be missed is the UNESCO-listed Canal Ring district. Here you’ll see some of the city’s finest houses and grand mansions perched on along the canal sides; as well as traditional white drawbridges. [ReadMore]

    Amsterdam is also home to a collection of incredible museums and galleries, many of which are world-renowned for their cultural, artistic and historical importance. There’s Anne Frank House, where Anne Frank and her family famously hid from the German occupiers in World War Two; Rijksmuseum, exhibiting ‘Golden Age’ paintings by artists such as Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals; the Van Gogh Museum, celebrating the life and works of legendary Vincent Van Gogh; and much more. In the spring and summer months, trips to the Tulip Museum and the Keukenhof Gardens are a must.

    For a little retail therapy Amsterdam’s abundance of shopping streets and busy markets won’t disappoint; while there are plenty of trendy cafés, bars and restaurants dotted around the city too. And of course, the iconic red light district offers a wealth of unique sights and experiences. Simply walking through the area is an experience in itself.

    Read More

  • Cruising Across Ijsselmeer

    Between stops at the iconic Dutch capital of Amsterdam and the historic city of Hoorn, experience a cruise across the shallow waters of the Ijsselmeer – the largest lake in the Netherlands and Western Europe.

    Between stops at the iconic Dutch capital of Amsterdam and the historic city of Hoorn, experience a cruise across the shallow waters of the Ijsselmeer – the largest lake in the Netherlands and Western Europe.

    This 1328 square-mile artificial lake was created in 1932, when the impressive 32 Kilometre-long Afsluitdijk dam was built to close off the southern part of the former Zuiderzee bay from the Waddenzee and North Sea. A freshwater lake, the Ijsselmeer is fed by several rivers including the Amstel, Rhine and Ijssel – which the lake is named after – and is popular for fishing and various watersports. Look out for the typically Dutch flat landscapes which surround the lake as you sail across.

  • Hoorn

    Believed to have been founded in the early 13th century, Hoorn quickly became one of the Netherlands’ most important harbour towns, serving as a link to the Baltic and Flanders regions. However it wasn’t until the prosperous times of the Dutch ‘Golden Age’ that Hoorn really began to thrive as the centre of the Netherlands’ international trade industry.

    Believed to have been founded in the early 13th century, Hoorn quickly became one of the Netherlands’ most important harbour towns, serving as a link to the Baltic and Flanders regions. However it wasn’t until the prosperous times of the Dutch ‘Golden Age’ that Hoorn really began to thrive as the centre of the Netherlands’ international trade industry.

    Aided by its new-found wealth, Hoorn grew quickly and significantly throughout the 17th century into the enchanting city that’s such a delight to explore today. Many of the beautiful buildings, statues and pretty squares constructed during the ‘Golden Age’ still exist and have been preserved over the years to retain the city’s charm and lavish style.

    The historic old centre in particular is a must-explore, showcasing quintessential Dutch architecture typical of the ‘Golden Age’ era. Among the highlights are the former Statencollege from 1632, which today houses a collection of 16th to 18th century paintings and a number of other exhibits; the statues and tall houses of Rode Steen square; the 16th century Hoofdtoren tower, which overlooks the busy harbour; and Oosterkerk church built circa 1519. Visiting the West Fries Museum, with its richly-adoned facade, is highly recommended for an interesting, in-depth insight into the influence the 'Golden Age' had in Hoorn. 

    As well an abundance of historic sights and attractions, Hoorn also offers plenty of places to indulge in some shopping or sample the local culture. Intertwined with the city's centuries-old structures are a number of trendy boutiques and shops, vibrant markets, theatres and galleries. The old town of Edam – world-renowned for its cheese production – is also just a short journey from Hoorn.

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Day 3
  • Kampen, Netherlands
  • Cruising on Ijssel River, Netherlands
  • Deventer, Netherlands
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  • Kampen

    Situated on the banks of the lower River Ijssel in the pretty Overijssel province, Hanseatic Kampen is always a memorable stop on a river cruise along the Netherlands’ winding waterways. Cruising to this charming city via the still waters of the Ijssel will present you with unspoilt views of gorgeous lush-green countryside, before the impressive sight of Kampen’s imposing, gothic-style Bovenkerk hints at the type of centuries-old structures awaiting your discovery ashore. 

    Situated on the banks of the lower River Ijssel in the pretty Overijssel province, Hanseatic Kampen is always a memorable stop on a river cruise along the Netherlands’ winding waterways. Cruising to this charming city via the still waters of the Ijssel will present you with unspoilt views of gorgeous lush-green countryside, before the impressive sight of Kampen’s imposing, gothic-style Bovenkerk hints at the type of centuries-old structures awaiting your discovery ashore.

    Although small, the enchanting centre of Kampen – one of the Netherlands’ best-preserved old town centres – still manages to pack in over 500 monuments, so you won’t be disappointed by the sheer volume and choice of historic attractions to uncover as you explore. Highlights include the Koornmarktpoort, Broederpoort and Cellebroederspoort gates, which date back to the 14th and 15th centuries; the 17th century Nieuwe Toren tower and carillon; and a collection of fine churches such as the Broederkerk, Buitenkerk, neoclassical-style Burgwalkerk and of course, the Bovenkerk. Stedelijk Museum Kampen – found within the late 14th century old town hall – is well worth a visit for an in-depth look into the fascinating commerce and shipping history of Kampen.  

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  • Cruising on Ijssel River

    Experience a relaxing journey along the picturesque Ijssel River as your river boat sails between two of the Netherlands’ oldest Hanseatic cities, Kampen and Deventer.

    Experience a relaxing journey along the picturesque Ijssel River as your river boat sails between two of the Netherlands’ oldest Hanseatic cities, Kampen and Deventer. Gliding along this winding section of the Ijssel is sure to be memorable, with views of the beautiful city of Zwolle, a string of pretty villages and towns, and the gorgeous countryside scenery of the Gelderland and Overijssel provinces to enjoy as relax on board. 

  • Deventer

    Deventer is one of the Netherlands’ oldest and most important historical cities. It is believed that the first settlement here appeared in the 9th century; however Deventer really came to prominence in the 10th century when it became a fortified city and a flourishing trade port – thanks to its favourable position on the banks of the River Ijssel. By 1500, Deventer had become so integral to the Dutch trade industry that the city became a member of the Hanseatic League.

    Deventer is one of the Netherlands’ oldest and most important historical cities. It is believed that the first settlement here appeared in the 9th century; however Deventer really came to prominence in the 10th century when it became a fortified city and a flourishing trade port – thanks to its favourable position on the banks of the River Ijssel. By 1500, Deventer had become so integral to the Dutch trade industry that the city became a member of the Hanseatic League.

    Between the 16th and 19th century Deventer’s importance as a trade city unfortunately dwindled because of the constant change in flow and depth of the Ijssel, which restricted access to cargo vessels. However, the previous years of growth and prosperity had already shaped Deventer into the delightful gem that is such a joy to explore today. The beating heart of the city is its enchanting historic centre, where narrow streets, avenues, alleys and squares are packed with striking structures and monuments – many of which date back to the Hanseatic era and beyond. With plenty to see, the best way to explore the city is on foot.

    Highlights include the Waag 16th century weighing house in Brink Square, which today is home to the interesting Deventer City Museum; the medieval Bergkerk ‘mountain church’; Grote Kerkhof church; and the imposing gothic-style Saint Lebuïnuskerk church, featuring an impressive tower and beautiful ceiling paintings. Deventer is also home to the oldest stone house in the Netherlands, which dates back to around 1130; as well as the country’s oldest library, Atheneumbibliotheek, and the oldest park, Worpplantsoen.

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Day 4
  • Cruising by Zutphen, Netherlands
  • Arnhem, Netherlands
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  • Cruising by Zutphen

    With its stunning countryside scenery and centuries-old architecture, the historic city of Zutphen is sure to catch your attention as you sail the Ijssel River through the heart of the Netherlands' picturesque Gelderland province. 

    With its stunning countryside scenery and centuries-old architecture, the historic city of Zutphen is sure to catch your attention as you sail the Ijssel River through the heart of the Netherlands' picturesque Gelderland province.

    As you glide slowly by you'll be presented with views of the imposing towers and spires of the medieval St Walburgis Church and St Janskerk Church; as well as old merchant houses lined-up along the banks of the river.

  • Arnhem

    Arnhem is best known for its role in World War Two when, thanks to the city’s prime strategic location on the banks of the Nederrijn river, it was the site of one of the war’s most famous battles. The epic Battle of Arnhem in 1944 – later dramatised by iconic war-film A Bridge Too Far – was one of the key Allied losses in the war, and a number of attractions in and around Arnhem – such as the interesting War Museum and the Airborne Museum – offer a fascinating insight into the city’s wartime heritage.

    Arnhem is best known for its role in World War Two when, thanks to the city’s prime strategic location on the banks of the Nederrijn river, it was the site of one of the war’s most famous battles. The epic Battle of Arnhem in 1944 – later dramatised by iconic war-film A Bridge Too Far – was one of the key Allied losses in the war, and a number of attractions in and around Arnhem – such as the interesting War Museum and the Airborne Museum – offer a fascinating insight into the city’s wartime heritage.

    There’s much more to Arnhem than its battle scars from the Second World War though. Believed to have been first settled in the Stone Age, the capital of the beautiful Gelderland province boasts a rich and eventful history stretching back way beyond 1944. This is reflected by a number of impressive structures, monuments and attractions dotted around the city’s various districts, including the striking, gothic-style St Eusebius Church and it’s imposing 93 metre-high tower; Bronbeek Museum; the 12th century Doorwerth Castle; and much more.

    Just outside of the city there’s much to discover too. Within easy reach are the Netherlands Open Air Museum, which is beautifully situated within a wooded park and displays exhibits from various eras in the region’s history; the National Heritage Museum; and the 17th century Paleis Het Loo, the Dutch Royal Family’s spectacular summer residence. Lovers of fauna and flora won’t want to miss the leafy landscapes of Sonsbeek Park and Burger’s Zoo and Safari Park, located just north of the city centre.

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Day 5
  • Cruising Pannerden Canal & Fortress, Netherlands
  • Nijmegen, Netherlands
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  • Cruising Pannerden Canal & Fortress

    As you sail this picturesque stretch of water through pretty Dutch countryside, be on the lookout for the historic Pannerden Fort – situated at the confluence of the Waal and Rhine rivers – as well as towns and villages such as Pannerden, which are dotted along the banks of the canal.

    Originally dredged in the early 18th century to improve river traffic and water flow at a large, shallow bend of the Rhine River, the Pannerden Canal is now so wide that it's indistinguishable from the river itself.

    As you sail this picturesque stretch of water through pretty Dutch countryside, be on the lookout for the historic Pannerden Fort – situated at the confluence of the Waal and Rhine rivers – as well as towns and villages such as Pannerden, which are dotted along the banks of the canal.

  • Nijmegen

    With origins dating back to Roman times, Nijmegen’s long – and somewhat turbulent – history spans well over 2000 years. For centuries, through the Roman, Hanseatic and Dutch Revolt eras, Nijmegen was heavily fortified and subjected to numerous attacks and sieges, which restricted the city’s growth. It wasn’t until the 19th century – when the largest fortifications were dismantled – that Nijmegen was able to expand and develop into the city you see today.

    With origins dating back to Roman times, Nijmegen’s long and somewhat turbulent history spans well over 2000 years. For centuries, through the Roman, Hanseatic and Dutch Revolt eras, Nijmegen was heavily fortified and subjected to numerous attacks and sieges, which restricted the city’s growth. It wasn’t until the 19th century, when the largest fortifications were dismantled, that Nijmegen was able to expand and develop into the city you see today

    Although Nijmegen is now the largest city in the Netherlands’ beautiful Gelderland province, it’s still relatively compact and easy to explore. The historic centre of the city – which was extensively damaged by German attacks and an accidental American bombing raid in World War Two – still offers a glimpse into the city’s fascinating past, with a few noteworthy structures and attractions to discover. The Carolingian chapel, believed to have built between 8th and 9th century AD; the remains of the Ottoman imperial castle; and the 15th century Town Hall are particular highlights.

    There are an abundance of impressive sights to uncover elsewhere in the city, including the 16th century weighing hall at Grote Markt; the 13th century St Stevenskerk church; and Lange Hezelstraat, the oldest shopping street in the Netherlands. Nijmegen is also home to a number of interesting museums, including the Het Valkhof Museum of art and archaeology, situated on a former Roman fortress site; the unique Afrika Museum; and the National Liberation Museum. During your relaxing time here you can take your pick from a collection of vibrant restaurants, busy bars – there are more bars here per square feet than anywhere else in the country – and excellent shops and boutiques too.

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Day 6
  • Düsseldorf, Germany
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  • Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    At first glimpse of the city you can’t help but be impressed by the sight of Düsseldorf’s landscape-dominating modern marvels. The soaring, 240 metre-high Rhine Tower and the distinctive structures of the MediaHarbor – which is home to the city’s trendiest bars, restaurants, cafés and hotels – are particularly impressive, showcasing the city’s wealth and recent development. Away from the banks of the Rhine there’s much more to discover within the ‘Stadtmitte’ district, such as the bustling, internationally-famous shopping street of Königsallee; the Japanese quarter; and the bustling banking quarter.

    Take time to dig a little deeper and you’ll uncover a plethora of historic highlights in Düsseldorf too. Within the charming Altstadt district – which was almost completely destroyed in World War Two and subsequently rebuilt – you can take in the monuments of Castle Square, including the remains of the baroque palace and the city monument; centuries-old churches such as St Lambertus Basilika and Neanderkirche; the 16th century Rathaus and much more. The Carlstadt district, with its many museums, galleries, markets and collection of pretty baroque-style architecture, is worth a visit too. 

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Dates & Prices
5th April 2018 - R1801
From £999 per person
Standard Room on Brabant

Standard Room

In the Standard Rooms on Haydn Deck 1, there’s plenty of room to relax and each is fully equipped with everything you need for a comfortable and enjoyable holiday. Amenities include an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Please note: the windows in the Standard Rooms are positioned high up and cannot be opened and the rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. 

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £999 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Strauss Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Strauss

The spacious Juliette Balcony Rooms on Strauss Deck 2 are approximately 161 sq ft. and offer a generous amount of room for an enjoyable river cruise experience. These rooms also include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, plenty of wardrobe space, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, a flat-screen TV, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,149 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Mozart Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Mozart

The sizable Juliette Balcony Rooms on Mozart Deck 3 offer everything needed for an enjoyable stay. The rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. and facilities include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), plenty of wardrobe space, a flat screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,199 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Suite on Brabant

Juliette Balcony Suite

There are just two Suites on board Brabant, both beautifully furnished and with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. Features include a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Extra benefits include a large comfortable seating area, an en suite bathroom with bathtub and toilet, complimentary bathrobe and a mini-bar (payable). The Juliette Balcony Suites are approximately 236 sq ft.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,349 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
15th April 2018 - R1803
From £999 per person
Standard Room on Brabant

Standard Room

In the Standard Rooms on Haydn Deck 1, there’s plenty of room to relax and each is fully equipped with everything you need for a comfortable and enjoyable holiday. Amenities include an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Please note: the windows in the Standard Rooms are positioned high up and cannot be opened and the rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. 

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £999 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Strauss Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Strauss

The spacious Juliette Balcony Rooms on Strauss Deck 2 are approximately 161 sq ft. and offer a generous amount of room for an enjoyable river cruise experience. These rooms also include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, plenty of wardrobe space, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, a flat-screen TV, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,149 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Mozart Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Mozart

The sizable Juliette Balcony Rooms on Mozart Deck 3 offer everything needed for an enjoyable stay. The rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. and facilities include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), plenty of wardrobe space, a flat screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,199 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Suite on Brabant

Juliette Balcony Suite

There are just two Suites on board Brabant, both beautifully furnished and with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. Features include a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Extra benefits include a large comfortable seating area, an en suite bathroom with bathtub and toilet, complimentary bathrobe and a mini-bar (payable). The Juliette Balcony Suites are approximately 236 sq ft.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,399 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
What's Included

Rest assured, all of the following comes as standard on every Fred. Olsen river cruise:

  • Comfortable en suite accommodation with TV, hairdryer, safe and individually controlled air conditioning 
  • Tempting cuisine every day throughout your cruise – with ‘early riser’ breakfast, breakfast buffet, casual lunch, five-course à la carte dinner and late-night snacks
  • Complimentary tea & coffee station 24 hours a day 
  • Complimentary afternoon tea & coffee with sandwiches and cakes 
  • Welcome Cocktail, Welcome Dinner and Captain’s Gala Dinner 
  • Complimentary Wi-Fi 
  • Use of leisure facilities including Fitness Room and Wellness Tub 
  • Lounge music by pianist, or duo every day 
  • All local taxes and port charges (where collectable in advance)
On Our Boat

Built in 2006, this elegant and comfortable vessel is in keeping with the fleet of our ocean-going cruise ships. Brabant’s bright and spacious public areas and 79 well-equipped rooms and suites, spread across four decks, provide the intimate, home-from-home feel which Fred. Olsen’s guests already know and love. Cruise ship staples such as swimming pools, a number of lounges and on-going activities are not in evidence on board, making way for a comfortable ambience and ample space in which to relax and enjoy the river cruise experience with around 150 fellow guests.

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