Delights of Holland in Bloom

  • 5 nights
  • Sails from Düsseldorf to Amsterdam
  • Brabant
Kinderdijk, Windmills

Embark on a wonderful five-night spring escape and discover a deluge of Dutch delights as you sail through gorgeous countryside to a string of quaint towns and fascinating cities. The time you spend ashore taking in fascinating museums, historic landmarks and more will be complemented by relaxing journeys along beautiful waterways – a memorable introduction to the river cruise experience aboard Brabant.

After meeting your river boat in the German city of Düsseldorf you’ll cross the border overnight before arriving in Arnhem, the first call on your itinerary. Just a short distance from the city and well-worth a visit is the Netherlands Open Air Museum, which exhibits interesting houses, antiques and monuments from various eras. The impressive Fort Pannerden will then be a sight to behold as you sail the Pannerden Canal to your next stop, Nijmegen. With time to explore the historic heart of the Netherlands’ oldest city, you could uncover Nijmegen’s treasured Roman artefacts or simply stroll along the Waalbrug and admire the charming Old Town. Your second day of Dutch exploration begins in Dordrecht, home to the fantastic Het Hof van Nederland Museum. Other highlights here include the glorious Great Church and a Dordtevarr open boat trip along the canals. A scenic jaunt through postcard-perfect countryside follows before stopping at Willemstad, renowned for its beautifully well-preserved centuries-old fortifications.

In contrast, Rotterdam – the next stop on this incredible cruise – is revered for its magnificent modern marvels. Having been extensively rebuilt after World War Two, the Netherlands’ stunning second city features astounding architectural wonders such as the Cube Houses, the amazing Markthal and the Erasmusbrug Bridge. There are top-drawer museums and galleries here too; while Rotterdam is also the gateway to famous pottery city of Delft. A short stop at Kinderdijk follows, presenting you with the opportunity to see the iconic collection of UNESCO-listed windmills before continuing on to Schoonhoven, the ‘Silver City’. During your final day you’ll have the chance to visit the resplendent, 32-hectare Keukenhof Gardens. Keukenhof is simply unmissable at this time of the year as the vibrant tulips burst into their colourful bloom during the spring. Whether you choose to explore the gardens on foot or via an electrically-propelled boat this is perfect way to conclude your rewarding spring break.    

Itinerary
Day Destination  
Day 1
  • Düsseldorf, Germany
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  • Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    Dazzling Düsseldorf – the capital of the North Rhine-Westphalia state – is a vibrant modern metropolis situated on the banks of the beautiful Rhine River. A thriving economic centre, this stylish city is one of Germany’s largest, wealthiest and most populated, and renowned for its international media, creative and financial industries, cosmopolitan culture, buzzing nightlife and striking architecture.

    At first glimpse of the city you can’t help but be impressed by the sight of Düsseldorf’s landscape-dominating modern marvels. The soaring, 240 metre-high Rhine Tower and the distinctive structures of the MediaHarbor – which is home to the city’s trendiest bars, restaurants, cafés and hotels – are particularly impressive, showcasing the city’s wealth and recent development. Away from the banks of the Rhine there’s much more to discover within the ‘Stadtmitte’ district, such as the bustling, internationally-famous shopping street of Königsallee; the Japanese quarter; and the bustling banking quarter.

    Take time to dig a little deeper and you’ll uncover a plethora of historic highlights in Düsseldorf too. Within the charming Altstadt district – which was almost completely destroyed in World War Two and subsequently rebuilt – you can take in the monuments of Castle Square, including the remains of the baroque palace and the city monument; centuries-old churches such as St Lambertus Basilika and Neanderkirche; the 16th century Rathaus and much more. The Carlstadt district, with its many museums, galleries, markets and collection of pretty baroque-style architecture, is worth a visit too. 

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Day 2
  • Arnhem, Netherlands
  • Cruising Pannerden Canal & Fortress, Netherlands
  • Nijmegen, Netherlands
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  • Arnhem

    Arnhem is best known for its role in World War Two when, thanks to the city’s prime strategic location on the banks of the Nederrijn river, it was the site of one of the war’s most famous battles. The epic Battle of Arnhem in 1944 – later dramatised by iconic war-film A Bridge Too Far – was one of the key Allied losses in the war, and a number of attractions in and around Arnhem – such as the interesting War Museum and the Airborne Museum – offer a fascinating insight into the city’s wartime heritage.

    Arnhem is best known for its role in World War Two when, thanks to the city’s prime strategic location on the banks of the Nederrijn river, it was the site of one of the war’s most famous battles. The epic Battle of Arnhem in 1944 – later dramatised by iconic war-film A Bridge Too Far – was one of the key Allied losses in the war, and a number of attractions in and around Arnhem – such as the interesting War Museum and the Airborne Museum – offer a fascinating insight into the city’s wartime heritage.

    There’s much more to Arnhem than its battle scars from the Second World War though. Believed to have been first settled in the Stone Age, the capital of the beautiful Gelderland province boasts a rich and eventful history stretching back way beyond 1944. This is reflected by a number of impressive structures, monuments and attractions dotted around the city’s various districts, including the striking, gothic-style St Eusebius Church and it’s imposing 93 metre-high tower; Bronbeek Museum; the 12th century Doorwerth Castle; and much more.

    Just outside of the city there’s much to discover too. Within easy reach are the Netherlands Open Air Museum, which is beautifully situated within a wooded park and displays exhibits from various eras in the region’s history; the National Heritage Museum; and the 17th century Paleis Het Loo, the Dutch Royal Family’s spectacular summer residence. Lovers of fauna and flora won’t want to miss the leafy landscapes of Sonsbeek Park and Burger’s Zoo and Safari Park, located just north of the city centre.

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  • Cruising Pannerden Canal & Fortress

    As you sail this picturesque stretch of water through pretty Dutch countryside, be on the lookout for the historic Pannerden Fort – situated at the confluence of the Waal and Rhine rivers – as well as towns and villages such as Pannerden, which are dotted along the banks of the canal.

    Originally dredged in the early 18th century to improve river traffic and water flow at a large, shallow bend of the Rhine River, the Pannerden Canal is now so wide that it's indistinguishable from the river itself.

    As you sail this picturesque stretch of water through pretty Dutch countryside, be on the lookout for the historic Pannerden Fort – situated at the confluence of the Waal and Rhine rivers – as well as towns and villages such as Pannerden, which are dotted along the banks of the canal.

  • Nijmegen

    With origins dating back to Roman times, Nijmegen’s long – and somewhat turbulent – history spans well over 2000 years. For centuries, through the Roman, Hanseatic and Dutch Revolt eras, Nijmegen was heavily fortified and subjected to numerous attacks and sieges, which restricted the city’s growth. It wasn’t until the 19th century – when the largest fortifications were dismantled – that Nijmegen was able to expand and develop into the city you see today.

    With origins dating back to Roman times, Nijmegen’s long and somewhat turbulent history spans well over 2000 years. For centuries, through the Roman, Hanseatic and Dutch Revolt eras, Nijmegen was heavily fortified and subjected to numerous attacks and sieges, which restricted the city’s growth. It wasn’t until the 19th century, when the largest fortifications were dismantled, that Nijmegen was able to expand and develop into the city you see today

    Although Nijmegen is now the largest city in the Netherlands’ beautiful Gelderland province, it’s still relatively compact and easy to explore. The historic centre of the city – which was extensively damaged by German attacks and an accidental American bombing raid in World War Two – still offers a glimpse into the city’s fascinating past, with a few noteworthy structures and attractions to discover. The Carolingian chapel, believed to have built between 8th and 9th century AD; the remains of the Ottoman imperial castle; and the 15th century Town Hall are particular highlights.

    There are an abundance of impressive sights to uncover elsewhere in the city, including the 16th century weighing hall at Grote Markt; the 13th century St Stevenskerk church; and Lange Hezelstraat, the oldest shopping street in the Netherlands. Nijmegen is also home to a number of interesting museums, including the Het Valkhof Museum of art and archaeology, situated on a former Roman fortress site; the unique Afrika Museum; and the National Liberation Museum. During your relaxing time here you can take your pick from a collection of vibrant restaurants, busy bars – there are more bars here per square feet than anywhere else in the country – and excellent shops and boutiques too.

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Day 3
  • Dordrecht, Netherlands
  • Cruising by Dutch Countryside, Netherlands
  • Willemstad, Netherlands
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  • Dordrecht

    Although it is believed that the original settlement appeared here on the banks of the Oude Maas in around 1049, Dordrecht officially became a city in 1220, making it the oldest city in the Netherlands’ historic Holland province. Situated on a vast island and surrounded by various tributaries and channels, Dordrecht – like so many other Dutch riverside cities – was a vital trading centre for centuries, exporting and importing goods such as wine, wood and cereals. 

    Although it is believed that the original settlement appeared here on the banks of the Oude Maas in around 1049, Dordrecht officially became a city in 1220, making it the oldest city in the Netherlands’ historic Holland province. Situated on a vast island and surrounded by various tributaries and channels, Dordrecht – like so many other Dutch riverside cities – was a vital trading centre for centuries, exporting and importing goods such as wine, wood and cereals.

    Dordrecht’s rich history is showcased in its picturesque centre, where charming inner-city harbours, a collection of beautiful buildings, monuments and fantastic museums offer a glimpse into the city’s fascinating past. The network of narrow streets here are easily explored on foot, and those that take time to wander through the heart of the city are rewarded by the sight of well-preserved 17th century town houses, the Neoclassical Stadhuis and much more.

    In total there are around 900 listed buildings and 700 municipal monuments here, so there’s plenty to see. Absolute must-visit attractions include the Grote Kerk church, with its impressive 65-metre-high tower and 67-bell carillon; the Dordrecht Museum, which houses a fantastic collection of paintings and exhibits; the old mayor’s house, Huis van Gijn; and the fantastic Het Hof museum. Also well worth a visit is Groothoofd, found just a short walk from the inner city, which presents you with views of the Oude Maas, Beneden Merwede and Noord rivers where they meet at Europe’s busiest river confluence.

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  • Cruising by Dutch Countryside

    Enjoy a scenic jaunt by beautiful Dutch countryside and take in picture-perfect views of traditional riverside towns and charming cattle farms from the comfort of your Fred. Olsen river boat.

    Enjoy a scenic jaunt by beautiful Dutch countryside and take in picture-perfect views of traditional riverside towns and charming cattle farms from the comfort of your Fred. Olsen river boat.

    As you sail narrow waterways through the Netherlands’ beautifully unspoilt, typically flat landscapes, a host of scenic Dutch delights will seem within touching distance from your boat’s decks.

  • Willemstad

    This historic fortified settlement emerged in the late 16th century when – under the orders of William of Orange – seven imposing fortifications were built to establish the village of Ruygenhil as a key strategic position on the confluence of the Hollands Diep, Haringvilet and Volerak waterways. While plans to create a naval port here never came to fruition, the village – renamed Willemstad after the death of William of Orange – served for several years as an important fishing and trading centre. 

    This historic fortified settlement emerged in the late 16th century when, under the orders of William of Orange, seven imposing fortifications were built to establish the village of Ruygenhil as a key strategic position on the confluence of the Hollands Diep, Haringvilet and Volerak waterways. While plans to create a naval port here never came to fruition, the village – renamed Willemstad after the death of William of Orange – served for several years as an important fishing and trading centre. 

    Beautifully well-preserved, the Willemstad of today retains its historic charm and has been largely untouched since the bastions and ramparts appeared here all those centuries ago. In the 1970’s Willemstad’s main, seven-pointed star-shaped district was declared a conservation area to protect the centuries-old buildings, monuments and fortifications, and it is here where you will find the most interesting and impressive sights. The 17th century Mauritshuis, the former residence of Prince Maurits; the Dome Church, the Netherlands’ first Protestant worship site; the gothic-revival style Blessed Virgin Mary Church; D’Orange Mill from 1734; and the 18th century Arsenal building are among the most popular of Willemstad’s many attractions.  

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Day 4
  • Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Kinderdijk, Netherlands
  • Schoonhoven, Netherlands
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  • Rotterdam

    While Rotterdam’s origins in fact date back to around 900CE, there’s little to suggest that the Netherlands’ stunning second city is actually centuries-old. After being almost completely obliterated by German bombing raids in the Second World War, Rotterdam was razed to the ground and subsequently rebuilt over many years to become the futuristic metropolis and thriving economic centre it is known as today.

    While Rotterdam’s origins in fact date back to around 900CE, there is little to suggest that the Netherlands’ stunning second city is actually centuries old. After the city was almost completely obliterated by German bombing raids in World War Two, Rotterdam was razed to the ground and redeveloped over many years into the futuristic metropolis and thriving economic centre that it is today.

    From the moment Rotterdam appears on your horizon as you sail the winding Nieuwe Maas, the city’s vast and dramatic post-war regeneration is clear to see. Magnificent towering skyscrapers line the riverbanks and impressive bridges – such as the iconic cable-stayed and bascule Erasmusbrug – span the waterway, hinting at the uber-cool modern districts awaiting your exploration ashore. In the vibrant heart of the city, you will discover an abundance of diverse sights and attractions, from the innovative 1970’s Cube Houses to the ultra-modern Markthal, which hosts a bustling indoor market. Rotterdam also boasts a number of interesting galleries and museums, as well as a large zoo and beautiful botanical gardens that are ideal for escaping the hustle and bustle.

    While the modern marvels dominate the experience here, there are a few surviving historic sites tucked away amongst the imposing post-war structures. These include Rotterdam’s quintessentially Dutch 18th and 19th century windmills; the City Hall from 1914, one of only a few city centre buildings to survive the war; Het Schielandshuis, the last 17th century structure remaining in the downtown district; and a collection of fine old churches including the Grote of Sint Laurenskerk and the 15th century Pilgrimfather’s Church. At the Port of Rotterdam – Europe’s busiest port – you can admire the S.S Rotterdam in all her restored glory too.

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  • Kinderdijk

    The beautiful, UNESCO-listed village of Kinderdijk is one of the most famous locations in the Netherlands. Situated in the heart of the Dutch polder lands at the confluence of the picturesque Lek and Noord Rivers, Kinderdijk is home to the largest collection of historic windmills in the world and attracts thousands of visitors from around the globe every year. 

    The beautiful, UNESCO-listed village of Kinderdijk is one of the most famous locations in the Netherlands. Situated in the heart of the Dutch polder lands at the confluence of the picturesque Lek and Noord Rivers, Kinderdijk is home to the largest collection of historic windmills in the world and attracts thousands of visitors from around the globe every year.

    The windmills of Kinderdijk were built in the mid-18th century as part of a flood defence system designed to keep the surrounding villages and the low-lying lands of Alblasserwaard, which are approximately 7 metres below sea level, dry.

    There are 19 of these iconic, quintessentially Dutch structures here in total, all linked by a network of dikes and roads. Taking a walk, bike ride or boat tour along these routes is the best way to capture this legendary landscape in all its splendour. For an in-depth look into the history of the windmills, the museum windmills of Blokweer and Nederwaard are must-visit sites. Don’t miss the interesting Wisboomgemaal Visitors Centre too.  

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  • Schoonhoven

    Although this historic city was an important shipping, brewing, fishing and agricultural centre for many years after its foundation on the banks of the River Lek in the 13th century, Schoonhoven is best known for its thriving precious metal trade. Since the 17th century the city has been a hub for artisan gold and silver smiths; and a few local craftsmen continue to forge jewellery, trinkets and more here today. It’s no surprise that the Schoonhoven is affectionately known as the ‘Silver City’. 

    Although this historic city was an important shipping, brewing, fishing and agricultural centre for many years after its foundation on the banks of the River Lek in the 13th century, Schoonhoven is best known for its thriving precious metal trade. Since the 17th century the city has been a hub for artisan gold and silver smiths; and a few local craftsmen continue to forge jewellery, trinkets and more here today. It is no surprise that the Schoonhoven is affectionately known as the ‘Silver City’.

    As Schoonhoven is relatively small, the ancient streets, harbours and canals are easily taken in on foot; and despite the city’s size, there are plenty of sights and highlights to uncover including 14 Dutch national monuments and an array of charming gabled houses. The main attraction of course relates to Schoonhoven’s silver industry. The Netherlands Silver Museum is a must visit to see the stunning collection of locally-made silverware, as well as number of 18th century clocks and watches which were made in the city too. The 17th century Veerpoort; the 15th century gothic-style Town Hall, which features an impressive bell tower; Bartholomew Church; and the remnants of the original city walls are well worth stopping-by too. 

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Day 5
  • Schoonhoven, Netherlands
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands
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  • Schoonhoven

    Although this historic city was an important shipping, brewing, fishing and agricultural centre for many years after its foundation on the banks of the River Lek in the 13th century, Schoonhoven is best known for its thriving precious metal trade. Since the 17th century the city has been a hub for artisan gold and silver smiths; and a few local craftsmen continue to forge jewellery, trinkets and more here today. It’s no surprise that the Schoonhoven is affectionately known as the ‘Silver City’. 

    Although this historic city was an important shipping, brewing, fishing and agricultural centre for many years after its foundation on the banks of the River Lek in the 13th century, Schoonhoven is best known for its thriving precious metal trade. Since the 17th century the city has been a hub for artisan gold and silver smiths; and a few local craftsmen continue to forge jewellery, trinkets and more here today. It is no surprise that the Schoonhoven is affectionately known as the ‘Silver City’.

    As Schoonhoven is relatively small, the ancient streets, harbours and canals are easily taken in on foot; and despite the city’s size, there are plenty of sights and highlights to uncover including 14 Dutch national monuments and an array of charming gabled houses. The main attraction of course relates to Schoonhoven’s silver industry. The Netherlands Silver Museum is a must visit to see the stunning collection of locally-made silverware, as well as number of 18th century clocks and watches which were made in the city too. The 17th century Veerpoort; the 15th century gothic-style Town Hall, which features an impressive bell tower; Bartholomew Church; and the remnants of the original city walls are well worth stopping-by too. 

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  • Amsterdam

    Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Today Amsterdam boasts one of the largest and most beautiful historic centres in Europe. Spread across 90 islands – linked by 400 bridges spanning the city’s iconic canals – the centre is packed with around 7,000 historic buildings, including many which date back to the ‘Golden Age’. Among the most impressive are the Royal Palace, which dominates Dam Square; a number of churches including the 17th century Westerkerk, Amsterdam’s tallest church; and the medieval houses of Begijnhof. Not to be missed is the UNESCO-listed Canal Ring district. Here you’ll see some of the city’s finest houses and grand mansions perched on along the canal sides; as well as traditional white drawbridges. [ReadMore]

    Amsterdam is also home to a collection of incredible museums and galleries, many of which are world-renowned for their cultural, artistic and historical importance. There’s Anne Frank House, where Anne Frank and her family famously hid from the German occupiers in World War Two; Rijksmuseum, exhibiting ‘Golden Age’ paintings by artists such as Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals; the Van Gogh Museum, celebrating the life and works of legendary Vincent Van Gogh; and much more. In the spring and summer months, trips to the Tulip Museum and the Keukenhof Gardens are a must.

    For a little retail therapy Amsterdam’s abundance of shopping streets and busy markets won’t disappoint; while there are plenty of trendy cafés, bars and restaurants dotted around the city too. And of course, the iconic red light district offers a wealth of unique sights and experiences. Simply walking through the area is an experience in itself.

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Day 6
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands
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  • Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Amsterdam originally emerged as a fishing village in the late 12th century, following the construction of a dam on the Netherlands’ Amstel River. Since those humble beginnings, Amsterdam’s development has been rapid and vast. Through the ‘Golden Age’, when Amsterdam was the world’s leading centre for finance and diamonds; the age of gold and silver; and periods of recession and recovery, the city grew to become the charming Dutch capital that’s adored by so many.

    Today Amsterdam boasts one of the largest and most beautiful historic centres in Europe. Spread across 90 islands – linked by 400 bridges spanning the city’s iconic canals – the centre is packed with around 7,000 historic buildings, including many which date back to the ‘Golden Age’. Among the most impressive are the Royal Palace, which dominates Dam Square; a number of churches including the 17th century Westerkerk, Amsterdam’s tallest church; and the medieval houses of Begijnhof. Not to be missed is the UNESCO-listed Canal Ring district. Here you’ll see some of the city’s finest houses and grand mansions perched on along the canal sides; as well as traditional white drawbridges. [ReadMore]

    Amsterdam is also home to a collection of incredible museums and galleries, many of which are world-renowned for their cultural, artistic and historical importance. There’s Anne Frank House, where Anne Frank and her family famously hid from the German occupiers in World War Two; Rijksmuseum, exhibiting ‘Golden Age’ paintings by artists such as Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals; the Van Gogh Museum, celebrating the life and works of legendary Vincent Van Gogh; and much more. In the spring and summer months, trips to the Tulip Museum and the Keukenhof Gardens are a must.

    For a little retail therapy Amsterdam’s abundance of shopping streets and busy markets won’t disappoint; while there are plenty of trendy cafés, bars and restaurants dotted around the city too. And of course, the iconic red light district offers a wealth of unique sights and experiences. Simply walking through the area is an experience in itself.

    Read More

Dates & Prices
10th April 2018 - R1802
From £999 per person
Standard Room on Brabant

Standard Room

In the Standard Rooms on Haydn Deck 1, there’s plenty of room to relax and each is fully equipped with everything you need for a comfortable and enjoyable holiday. Amenities include an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Please note: the windows in the Standard Rooms are positioned high up and cannot be opened and the rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. 

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £999 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Strauss Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Strauss

The spacious Juliette Balcony Rooms on Strauss Deck 2 are approximately 161 sq ft. and offer a generous amount of room for an enjoyable river cruise experience. These rooms also include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, plenty of wardrobe space, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, a flat-screen TV, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,149 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Mozart Grade

Juliette Balcony Room Mozart

The sizable Juliette Balcony Rooms on Mozart Deck 3 offer everything needed for an enjoyable stay. The rooms are approximately 161 sq ft. and facilities include floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, an en suite bathroom with shower and toilet, a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), plenty of wardrobe space, a flat screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,199 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
Juliette Balcony Room Suite on Brabant

Juliette Balcony Suite

There are just two Suites on board Brabant, both beautifully furnished and with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. Features include a choice of bed configuration (double or twin), ample wardrobe space, a flat-screen TV, a direct-dial telephone, a hairdryer, individual climate control and a safe. Extra benefits include a large comfortable seating area, an en suite bathroom with bathtub and toilet, complimentary bathrobe and a mini-bar (payable). The Juliette Balcony Suites are approximately 236 sq ft.

Room Layout

 
Fly-Cruise from £1,399 per person For cruise only deduct £250pp
What's Included

Rest assured, all of the following comes as standard on every Fred. Olsen river cruise:

  • Comfortable en suite accommodation with TV, hairdryer, safe and individually controlled air conditioning 
  • Tempting cuisine every day throughout your cruise – with ‘early riser’ breakfast, breakfast buffet, casual lunch, five-course à la carte dinner and late-night snacks
  • Complimentary tea & coffee station 24 hours a day 
  • Complimentary afternoon tea & coffee with sandwiches and cakes 
  • Welcome Cocktail, Welcome Dinner and Captain’s Gala Dinner 
  • Complimentary Wi-Fi 
  • Use of leisure facilities including Fitness Room and Wellness Tub 
  • Lounge music by pianist, or duo every day 
  • All local taxes and port charges (where collectable in advance)
On Our Boat

Built in 2006, this elegant and comfortable vessel is in keeping with the fleet of our ocean-going cruise ships. Brabant’s bright and spacious public areas and 79 well-equipped rooms and suites, spread across four decks, provide the intimate, home-from-home feel which Fred. Olsen’s guests already know and love. Cruise ship staples such as swimming pools, a number of lounges and on-going activities are not in evidence on board, making way for a comfortable ambience and ample space in which to relax and enjoy the river cruise experience with around 150 fellow guests.

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