River Danube & City Discovery

  • 8 nights
  • Sails from Budapest to Nuremberg
  • Brabant
Bratislava Castle

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Packed with some of Europe’s very best sights and highlights, from the historic landmarks and attractions of stunning destinations to the scenic delights of the River Danube, this is an epic eight-night journey of discovery. Aboard Brabant you’ll experience the spellbinding Wachau Valley, winding Schlögener Schlinge and the narrow Main-Danube Canal; while ashore there are chances to explore romantic Austrian towns, medieval German cities and vibrant capitals.

In beautiful Budapest, be sure to uncover the famous Millennium Underground Railway, stroll along Andrássy Avenue to Heroes’ Square, and stop-by Buda Castle during the first morning of your cruise. Explore at your leisure before you set sail, heading off for an afternoon of scenic cruising through the postcard-perfect mountain scenery of the Danube Bend. A day in Bratislava follows, allowing time to discover the Slovakian capital’s array of attractions. Classic and contemporary architecture, medieval ruins and pretty parks and lakes; this city has it all. Don’t miss the castle and the fantastic observation point at the Slovak National Bridge. Then it’s on to another of the Danube’s glorious capitals, Vienna. Again a day here will allow plenty of time for exploration and discovery. Perhaps take the highly recommended tour to Schönbrunn Palace, or opt to visit Hofburg Palace, home of the Austrian crown jewels; Stadtpark; or Ringstrasse, encircling the treasures of the Old Town.

Your Austrian adventures continue in Dürnstein. Make the most of your morning here to explore the ruins of the castle where Richard the Lionheart was once imprisoned, then board your river boat once again for a scenic cruise through the mesmerising, vineyard-laden Wachau Valley en route to charming Emmersdorf and Melk. Your time in Austria will then come to an end in style as Brabant transits the Schlögener Schlinge, a winding passage shrouded by rich forest, before crossing the border into Germany. Passau makes for a rewarding start to the German leg of your cruise, with its impressive monuments and landmarks such as the towering St Stephen's Cathedral. You’ll then have the chance to marvel at the largest collection of listed buildings found anywhere north of the Alps in Regensburg – Germany’s ‘medieval miracle’ – and enjoy a memorable diversion though the locks of the historic Main-Danube Canal as you sail to Nuremburg. This may be your final stop, however its sure to impress. Attractions here including the Rallying Grounds Documentation Centre and Nuremberg Trials Memorium; the imposing Nuremberg Castle; and the legendary DB Railway Museum.

Itinerary
Day Destination  
Day 1
  • Budapest, Hungary
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  • Bustling and beautiful Budapest is an explorer’s dream destination. Straddling the magnificent Danube River, Hungary’s historic capital is split into two distinct districts: Buda, with its steep hills, streets and alleys; and low-lying Pest, where architectural and cultural treasures are in abundance. Exploring Budapest on either side of the water is an unforgettable experience, with unique and fascinating attractions to discover at every turn, but if you have time it’s well worth hopping back and forth via the impressive bridges to take in as many of the city’s spectacular sights as you can. 

    Bustling and beautiful Budapest is an explorer’s dream destination. Straddling the magnificent Danube River, Hungary’s historic capital is split into two distinct districts: Buda, with its steep hills, streets and alleys; and low-lying Pest, where architectural and cultural treasures are in abundance. Exploring Budapest on either side of the water is an unforgettable experience, with unique and fascinating attractions to discover at every turn, but if you have time it is well worth hopping back and forth via the impressive bridges to take in as many of the city’s spectacular sights as you can.

    The highlights of the Buda side include the Ottoman-era thermal baths located at the foot of the majestic Gellért Hill; the ornate Royal Palace; Matthias Church, with its soaring rococo spire; Buda Castle, the crowning glory of Budapest’s cityscape; and much more.

    The awe-inspiring Parliament building – a neo-gothic, neo-Romanesque and neo-baroque architectural wonder perched on the Danube’s banks – beckons you to explore the Pest side of the river. Here you can also uncover the charms of the pretty Jewish Quarter – which is home to the incredible Great Synagogue – and the Palace District; stop-by the striking St Stephen’s Basillica; and visit a number of fantastic galleries and museums.

    As well as a plethora of historic attractions, Budapest also boasts plenty of trendy cafés, superb restaurants and bars, and a number of busy shopping streets where you can indulge in a little retail therapy – just as you would expect from a city that today is considered one of the world’s major metropolises.  

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Day 2
  • Budapest, Hungary
  • Cruising the Danube Bend, Hungary
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  • Budapest

    Bustling and beautiful Budapest is an explorer’s dream destination. Straddling the magnificent Danube River, Hungary’s historic capital is split into two distinct districts: Buda, with its steep hills, streets and alleys; and low-lying Pest, where architectural and cultural treasures are in abundance. Exploring Budapest on either side of the water is an unforgettable experience, with unique and fascinating attractions to discover at every turn, but if you have time it’s well worth hopping back and forth via the impressive bridges to take in as many of the city’s spectacular sights as you can. 

    Bustling and beautiful Budapest is an explorer’s dream destination. Straddling the magnificent Danube River, Hungary’s historic capital is split into two distinct districts: Buda, with its steep hills, streets and alleys; and low-lying Pest, where architectural and cultural treasures are in abundance. Exploring Budapest on either side of the water is an unforgettable experience, with unique and fascinating attractions to discover at every turn, but if you have time it is well worth hopping back and forth via the impressive bridges to take in as many of the city’s spectacular sights as you can.

    The highlights of the Buda side include the Ottoman-era thermal baths located at the foot of the majestic Gellért Hill; the ornate Royal Palace; Matthias Church, with its soaring rococo spire; Buda Castle, the crowning glory of Budapest’s cityscape; and much more.

    The awe-inspiring Parliament building – a neo-gothic, neo-Romanesque and neo-baroque architectural wonder perched on the Danube’s banks – beckons you to explore the Pest side of the river. Here you can also uncover the charms of the pretty Jewish Quarter – which is home to the incredible Great Synagogue – and the Palace District; stop-by the striking St Stephen’s Basillica; and visit a number of fantastic galleries and museums.

    As well as a plethora of historic attractions, Budapest also boasts plenty of trendy cafés, superb restaurants and bars, and a number of busy shopping streets where you can indulge in a little retail therapy – just as you would expect from a city that today is considered one of the world’s major metropolises.  

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  • Cruising the Danube Bend

    For simply spectacular scenic beauty, not many places in Europe can match the Danube Bend. This stunning region – situated just north of Budapest – is widely regarded as the most beautiful stretch of the River Danube, so it’s no wonder that its Hungary’s most visited tourist attraction. 

    For simply spectacular scenic beauty, not many places in Europe can match the Danube Bend. This stunning region – situated just north of Budapest – is widely regarded as the most beautiful stretch of the River Danube, so it’s no wonder that its Hungary’s most visited tourist attraction.

    As you sail the sharp twists and turns aboard your river boat – the best way to experience the bend in all its scenic splendour – you’ll take in gorgeous countryside scenery, see picturesque peaks and pass by several fascinating historic towns dotted along both banks of the river. Particular highlights to look out for are at the towns of Szentendre, Visegrád – Hungary’s 15th century ‘Camelot’, featuring an impressive hilltop fortress – and sleepy Esztergom, home to the largest cathedral in the country. 

Day 3
  • Bratislava, Slovakia
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  • Beautiful Bratislava – Slovakia’s engrossing capital – is one of the most intriguing, immersive and diverse cities in Europe, combining contemporary delights and an abundance of historic highlights with the scenic beauty of the picturesque Danube River.  Unlike many other European capitals, the city is laid-back rather than frenetic and – despite growth in recent years – retains an enchanting small town charm. 

    Beautiful Bratislava – Slovakia’s engrossing capital – is one of the most intriguing, immersive and diverse cities in Europe, combining contemporary delights and an abundance of historic highlights with the scenic beauty of the picturesque Danube River. Unlike many other European capitals, the city is laid-back rather than frenetic and, despite considerable growth in recent years, retains an enchanting small town charm.

    Walking through the uncrowded streets of Bratislava is like stepping back in time. Although the city only became a capital in 1993 – when Slovakia received its independence – its origins in fact date back to around 200BC. The locals here are rightly proud of their city’s over 2,000-year history and it shows. In the remarkably well-preserved heart of the city await several structures and monuments which hark back to times when Bratislava was a major trading hub and one of Europe’s great Renaissance-era cities.

    The most eye-catching of them all is the imposing white-walled castle, which has overlooked the city since the 9th century, while the collection of churches, palaces and ancient gates are well worth taking the time to uncover too. The gothic-style St Martin’s Cathedral, the former coronation-church of several Hungarian kings; the art-nouveau Church of St Elizabeth; Primate’s Palace; and the Grassalkovich Palace and gardens are among the many memorable sights. For museums and galleries you are spoilt for choice in Bratislava too. Take your pick of the Slovak National Museum, the Slovak National Gallery, the Bratislava City Gallery and much more. 

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Day 4
  • Nussdorf (Vienna) , Austria
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  • The largest and brightest shining of the many jewels in Austria’s crown, Vienna is without doubt among the most beautiful and captivating capitals in Europe. A leading artistic and cultural hub, the city was once home to many of the great composers, such as Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn and Schubert, and is renowned for its contribution to theatre, the arts, opera and classical music over the years. It is also revered for boasting one of the most architecturally diverse historic centres found anywhere on the continent.

    The largest and brightest shining of the many jewels in Austria’s crown, Vienna is without doubt among the most beautiful and captivating capitals in Europe. A leading artistic and cultural hub, the city was once home to many of the great composers, such as Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn and Schubert, and is renowned for its contribution to theatre, the arts, opera and classical music over the years. It is also revered for boasting one of the most architecturally diverse historic centres found anywhere on the continent.

    Vienna is a vast city, spread out along both banks of the River Danube, and is perfect for a few hours of rewarding exploration. After your riverboat berths in the nearby suburb of Nussdorf, you can head into the city to take your pick of a wealth of attractions. The UNESCO-listed historic centre is awash with highlights; Baroque castles and imperial palaces, ancient buildings and impressive landmarks and monuments all await you here.

    The stunning Schönbrunn Palace, formerly the Imperial summer residence; the imposing Hofburg Palace, which was the base of the Habsburgs for over 600 years; and splendid Belvedere Palace are just a trio of Vienna’s most popular sights. Don’t miss the Stadtpark, striking gothic-style Stephansdom cathedral and the iconic structures of the Ringstrasse, including the Flemish-Gothic City Hall, the Parliament building and the New Baroque Burgtheater, too.

    As well as architectural marvels, Vienna is – as you might expect from such a culture-rich city – also home to an abundance of fantastic galleries and museums. Among the city’s best cultural venues are the Museum of Fine Arts, which exhibits the world’s largest collection of Bruegel paintings; the Rinsgstrasse’s Kunsthistorisches Museum; and the many institutions of the MuseumsQuartier, such as Leopold Museum, the Museum Moderner Kunst, Architekturzentrum and Kunsthalle. No time spent in Vienna is complete without visiting the neo-renaissance State Opera, Musikverein, the Staatsoper and the Haus der Musik museum to immerse yourself in the City of Music’s famous musical heritage.

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Day 5
  • Dürnstein, Austria
  • Cruising the Wachau Valley, Austria
  • Emmersdorf & Melk, Austria
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  • Dürnstein

    Austria’s romantic, UNESCO-listed Wachau Valley is world-renowned for its spectacular natural scenery, historic sights and famous wines, and nowhere better epitomises the appeal of this stunning region than Dürnstein. Situated on a curve of the Danube River afront forested hills, and home to steep vineyards and a collection of beautifully well-preserved medieval buildings, this town is as picture-perfect as they come. 

    Austria’s romantic, UNESCO-listed Wachau Valley is world-renowned for its spectacular natural scenery, historic sights and famous wines, and nowhere better epitomises the appeal of this stunning region than Dürnstein. Situated on a curve of the Danube River afront forested hills, and home to steep vineyards and a collection of beautifully well-preserved medieval buildings, this town is as picture-perfect as they come.

    Simply admiring Dürnstein from your riverboat on a Danube River cruise would be an experience to behold, so picturesque is the town, but stopping here to explore one of Austria’s most popular tourist spots is all the more rewarding. After all, there must be a reason why the town’s population of a few hundred swells to a few thousand in the summer months, when people from all corners of the globe visit.

    Although Dürnstein is a small town, there are plenty of highlights and attractions to discover as you wander the narrow streets and alleys. Pin Dürnstein, which features a magnificent blue tower; the Kunigunde church, built in the early 13th century; the striking City Hall; and impressive Fort Clarissinnenkirche all await your discovery just a short distance from your boat.

    The ruins of the city’s 12th century castle, Burgruine Dürnstein, are not to be missed. The castle towers over Dürnstein from atop a steep hill, and it’s well worth making the effort to climb to this historic fortification to learn of its links to Richard the Lionheart and enjoy unspoilt views of the Danube and the Wachau Valley’s astonishing scenic landscapes. If you’re tempted to try a glass or two of the region’s delicious tipples, be sure to visit one of the friendly taverns or wine cellars too. 

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  • Cruising the Wachau Valley

    The Wachau Valley is a spectacular 33 Kilometre-long section of the Danube River, stretched between the historic Austrian towns of Melk and Krems. UNESCO-listed in recognition of its diverse landscapes, the Wachau is a showcase of postcard-perfect scenery consisting of enchanting medieval towns, world-renowned vineyards and gently rolling hills as far as the eye can see.

    The Wachau Valley is a spectacular 33 Kilometre-long section of the Danube River, stretched between the historic Austrian towns of Melk and Krems. UNESCO-listed in recognition of its diverse landscapes, the Wachau is a showcase of postcard-perfect scenery consisting of enchanting medieval towns, world-renowned vineyards and gently rolling hills as far as the eye can see.

    Throw in the wonderfully mild climate and soothing sunshine the Wachau benefits from and you have one of the most unforgettable areas of scenic cruising to be discovered anywhere along the enchanting Danube River.

  • Emmersdorf & Melk

    At the south-western entrance of the beautiful, UNESCO-listed Wachau Valley lie the charming town of Emmersdorf and the historic city of Melk – two of Lower Austria’s prettiest and most popular holiday destinations. Whether you choose to explore one or both of these small, yet attraction-packed settlements situated on opposite sides of the River Danube, you’re in for an enjoyable and rewarding experience here during your Danube River cruise. 

    At the south-western entrance of the beautiful, UNESCO-listed Wachau Valley lie the charming town of Emmersdorf and the historic city of Melk – two of Lower Austria’s prettiest and most popular holiday destinations. Whether you choose to explore one or both of these small, yet attraction-packed settlements situated on opposite sides of the River Danube, you’re in for an enjoyable and rewarding experience here during your Danube River cruise.

    The centre of Emmersdorf is within walking distance of your riverboat’s berth and is the perfect place to start a couple of hours of relaxing exploration ashore. Head into the town beyond the colourful waterfront buildings and you’ll uncover a few interesting sites, including the late-gothic parish church of St Nikolaus, a collection of 16th century wine houses, the Town Hall and a couple of fine restaurants such as Schloss Rothenhof. Look over towards Melk and the sight of the magnificent Melk Abbey will hint at the historic highlights awaiting you across the river.

    Melk is a short journey across the Danube Bridge from Emmersdorf and no time here is complete without venturing over the river to visit the city’s iconic Benedictine abbey – considered one of the most famous, elaborate and important monasteries in Austria. While the abbey’s stunning architecture is a sight to behold, its hill-top position also provides spectacular views of Melk, the Danube and the surrounding countryside scenery which are not-to-be-missed. Elsewhere in the city – which is easily explored on foot – it’s worth taking in the 16th century Town Hall; Haus am Stein, Melk’s oldest building; and the striking towers and domes of the Stiftskirche. 

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Day 6
  • Cruising Schlögener Schlinge, Germany
  • Passau, Germany
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  • Cruising Schlögener Schlinge

    Immerse yourself in the breathtaking beauty, peace and tranquility of some of the most spectacular scenery seen anywhere along the Danube River, as your river boat negotiates the seemingly endless meanders of the Schlögener Schlinge. 

    Immerse yourself in the breathtaking beauty, peace and tranquility of some of the most spectacular scenery seen anywhere along the Danube River, as your river boat negotiates the seemingly endless meanders of the Schlögener Schlinge.

    Slicing through the beautiful Upper Danube Valley, the Schlögener Schlinge is often described as 'the natural wonder of Upper Austria' and you'll soon understand why as you sail slowly through the flora-rich forested hills and valleys.

  • Passau

    On the German-Austrian border at the confluence of the Danube, Inn and Ilz rivers sits the charming Bavarian city of Passau. Nicknamed the ‘City of Three Rivers’, pretty Passau has made the most of its unique location throughout its fascinating history. For centuries its waterways were vital trading routes, bringing wealth which helped to shape and develop the beautiful old streets here; while today they serve as gateways for visitors stopping-by to take in the city’s historic highlights and cultural delights. 

    On the German-Austrian border at the confluence of the Danube, Inn and Ilz rivers sits the charming Bavarian city of Passau. Nicknamed the ‘City of Three Rivers’, pretty Passau has made the most of its unique location throughout its fascinating history. For centuries its waterways were vital trading routes, bringing wealth which helped to shape and develop the beautiful old streets here; while today they serve as gateways for visitors stopping-by to take in the city’s historic highlights and cultural delights.

    As well as its rivers, Passau is renowned for its colourful architecture and typically Bavarian charm. Wandering the delightful streets of this relatively small and easy to explore city is always a memorable spectacle, with an abundance of sights to uncover. The Altstadt old town district – largely untouched since prince bishops ordered its construction in the 17th century –  is home to a number of soaring towers, stunning palaces, pretty promenades and the gothic-style Town Hall; as well as the iconic St Stephen’s Cathedral. This wonderfully ornate, baroque-style monument is a must-visit to marvel at the huge organ and grand bells alone.

    The Vesta Oberhaus, which towers above the city on the northern bank of the Danube, is not to be missed too. Built in the 13th century to guard Passau, this impressive fortress is today a fascinating museum and gallery showcasing the city’s interesting history. Also well worth a visit is the Pilgrimage church ‘Mariahilf’; the glass museum, which exhibits one of the largest glassware collections in the world; and the Innpromenade, where you can take in the pretty parks and ancient tunnels, enjoy some retail therapy and grab a pint of the local brew, and see where the city’s three rivers meet. 

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Day 7
  • Regensburg, Germany
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  • Nicknamed ‘Germany’s medieval miracle’, resplendent Regensburg is considered amongst the finest medieval cities in Europe. Originally settled by the Romans in 179AD under the control of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, Regensburg was the first capital of Bavaria and a Free Imperial City for around 600 years. Today it is simply one of Germany’s oldest and finest cities.

    Nicknamed ‘Germany’s medieval miracle’, resplendent Regensburg is considered amongst the finest medieval cities in Europe. Originally settled by the Romans in 179AD under the control of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, Regensburg was the first capital of Bavaria and a Free Imperial City for around 600 years. Today it is simply one of Germany’s oldest and finest cities.

    The locals here are rightly proud of their hometown’s remarkable 2000-year-old history and it shows. Incredibly well-preserved, this stunning city – situated in a scenic setting at the confluence of the Danube, Naab and Regen – is an unmolested maze of historic streets, squares, landmarks and monuments, which are sure to delight and enchant from the moment you arrive here. Approximately 1500 listed buildings are packed into the historic heart of Regensburg, 984 of which are within the UNESCO-listed Stadtamhof Old Town. The 12th century Stone Bridge across the Danube; striking German-Gothic cathedral; Collegiate Church of St John; castle-like Patrician ‘Heuport’ house; and historic Adler pharmacy are among the most significant. You’ll even uncover the world’s oldest sausage house within Stadtamhof too.

    Otherwise it’s worth taking a walk along the bank of the Danube to enjoy the scenery and encounter the Roland Fountain at Fischmarkt Square; while elsewhere in the city you could choose to see St Ulrich’s Church and the Patrician Towers, or take your pick of over 20 fantastic museums.

    Don’t for a moment think that historic Regensburg is stuck asleep in a time warp though. Despite its medieval appearance, the city’s atmosphere is energetic and youthful with modern cultural delights such as theatre, dance and art on show; while many of the oldest buildings in the city centre are thriving once again as hosts to trendy restaurants and coffee shops. Lovers of locally-crafted beer and wine will delight in the knowledge that Regensburg boasts the largest number of pubs and bars than any other German city too.

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Day 8
  • Cruising Main Danube Canal, Germany
  • Nuremberg, Germany
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  • Cruising Main Danube Canal

    Germany's magnificent Main-Danube Canal is one of the most important and impressive European waterways, serving as a vital link between the Main and Danube rivers and connecting south-eastern Europe to northern Europe, the North Sea and beyond. 

    Germany's magnificent Main-Danube Canal is one of the most important and impressive European waterways, serving as a vital link between the Main and Danube rivers and connecting south-eastern Europe to northern Europe, the North Sea and beyond.

    A cruise along this incredible 106 mile-long canal is always a simply unforgettable experience. Sit back, relax and enjoy the ever-changing scenery as your river boat winds its way along the canal's kinks and corners, negotiates remarkable locks as the waterway rises and falls with the surrounding landscape, and passes by countless picturesque cities and towns. 

  • Nuremberg

    A major commercial city with a distinctly cosmopolitan feel, Nuremberg is today one of Germany’s most vibrant, energetic and endlessly stimulating destinations. Home to an abundance of cultural highlights and exciting attractions, from stylish galleries and museums to trendy bars, cafés and lively markets, as well as a few exciting annual events, Nuremberg offers a taste of modern German life.

    A major commercial city with a distinctly cosmopolitan feel, Nuremberg is today one of Germany’s most vibrant, energetic and endlessly stimulating destinations. Home to an abundance of cultural highlights and exciting attractions, from stylish galleries and museums to trendy bars, cafés and lively markets, as well as a few exciting annual events, Nuremberg offers a taste of modern German life.

    There’s much more to Bavaria’s second largest city than contemporary delights though. While Nuremberg tries it’s best to shake off the shackles of its infamous past, there’s simply no ignoring the city’s diverse – and often damaging – history. With origins dating back to Roman times – the city was once the undeclared capital of the Holy Roman Empire – Nuremberg is a picture book of centuries-old structures, especially in the old town ‘Altstadt’ district. Historic highlights here include the collection of medieval half-timbered houses and gothic churches such as the mid-13th century St Lorenz Cathedral; the 13th century Nassauer Haus; and the city’s most impressive sight, the towering Kaiserberg Imperial Castle.

    No time spent in Nuremberg is complete without examining the city’s importance in World War Two. An icon of the Nazi regime, Nuremberg hosted several of Adolf Hitler’s fanatical propaganda rallies throughout the war before being largely destroyed by Allied bombing raids in 1945; and after the war was chosen as the site of the war crimes tribunal, now known as the Nuremberg Trials. Reichsparteitagsgelände – where the famous black and white images of Nazi supporters hailing Hitler were taken – and the Nuremberg Trials Memorial are both must-visit sites, offering an emotive and unforgettable insight into this remarkable period of the city’s history.

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Day 9
  • Nuremberg, Germany
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  • A major commercial city with a distinctly cosmopolitan feel, Nuremberg is today one of Germany’s most vibrant, energetic and endlessly stimulating destinations. Home to an abundance of cultural highlights and exciting attractions, from stylish galleries and museums to trendy bars, cafés and lively markets, as well as a few exciting annual events, Nuremberg offers a taste of modern German life.

    A major commercial city with a distinctly cosmopolitan feel, Nuremberg is today one of Germany’s most vibrant, energetic and endlessly stimulating destinations. Home to an abundance of cultural highlights and exciting attractions, from stylish galleries and museums to trendy bars, cafés and lively markets, as well as a few exciting annual events, Nuremberg offers a taste of modern German life.

    There’s much more to Bavaria’s second largest city than contemporary delights though. While Nuremberg tries it’s best to shake off the shackles of its infamous past, there’s simply no ignoring the city’s diverse – and often damaging – history. With origins dating back to Roman times – the city was once the undeclared capital of the Holy Roman Empire – Nuremberg is a picture book of centuries-old structures, especially in the old town ‘Altstadt’ district. Historic highlights here include the collection of medieval half-timbered houses and gothic churches such as the mid-13th century St Lorenz Cathedral; the 13th century Nassauer Haus; and the city’s most impressive sight, the towering Kaiserberg Imperial Castle.

    No time spent in Nuremberg is complete without examining the city’s importance in World War Two. An icon of the Nazi regime, Nuremberg hosted several of Adolf Hitler’s fanatical propaganda rallies throughout the war before being largely destroyed by Allied bombing raids in 1945; and after the war was chosen as the site of the war crimes tribunal, now known as the Nuremberg Trials. Reichsparteitagsgelände – where the famous black and white images of Nazi supporters hailing Hitler were taken – and the Nuremberg Trials Memorial are both must-visit sites, offering an emotive and unforgettable insight into this remarkable period of the city’s history.

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Dates & Prices
23rd May 2018 - R1808
What's Included

Rest assured, all of the following comes as standard on every Fred. Olsen river cruise:

  • Comfortable en suite accommodation with TV, hairdryer, safe and individually controlled air conditioning 
  • Tempting cuisine every day throughout your cruise – with ‘early riser’ breakfast, breakfast buffet, casual lunch, five-course à la carte dinner and late-night snacks
  • Complimentary tea & coffee station 24 hours a day 
  • Complimentary afternoon tea & coffee with sandwiches and cakes 
  • Welcome Cocktail, Welcome Dinner and Captain’s Gala Dinner 
  • Complimentary Wi-Fi 
  • Use of leisure facilities including Fitness Room and Wellness Tub 
  • Lounge music by pianist, or duo every day 
  • All local taxes and port charges (where collectable in advance)
On Our Boat

Built in 2006, this elegant and comfortable vessel is in keeping with the fleet of our ocean-going cruise ships. Brabant’s bright and spacious public areas and 79 well-equipped rooms and suites, spread across four decks, provide the intimate, home-from-home feel which Fred. Olsen’s guests already know and love. Cruise ship staples such as swimming pools, a number of lounges and on-going activities are not in evidence on board, making way for a comfortable ambience and ample space in which to relax and enjoy the river cruise experience with around 150 fellow guests.

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