Stornoway, Isle of Lewis

Introduction to Stornoway, Isle of Lewis

Stornoway is the largest town and port of the Outer Hebrides islands of Scotland.

Stornoway is the chief town of Lewis, on the island of Lewis and Harris. It is part of the Western Isles council area and the historic county of Ross-shire in the historic region of Ross and Cromarty. Lewis & Harris are the largest and most northerly of Scotland's Outer Hebrides islands, lying 24 miles (39 km) from the west coast of the Scottish mainland and separated from it by the Minch channel.

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Iron Age House, Bostadh, Stornoway

Bostadh Sands & Iron Age House

  • Discover the impressive Bostadh Iron Age House
  • Admire the ancient dwelling and learn about their way of life
Price£60.00-£70.00
DurationApproximately 3 3/4 hours
Walking level 2 - moderate walkingModerate walking

Explore a remote but beautiful part of North Lewis, and enjoy glorious views of golden beaches as well as a unique chance to visit an Iron Age house that has been reconstructed.

Starting out from Stornoway, you drive to the Island of Great Bernera, which is joined to the main island by a narrow bridge. It is a rocky island, dotted with lochans, fringed by a few small lobster fishing settlements, owned by the Queen’s former herald.

The coach will drop you close to the deserted village of Bostadh. Gale force winds revealed an entire Iron Age settlement here in 1992, perched above a bay of golden sand. One of the ancient dwellings has now been completely restored – the Iron Age House. Inside, once your eyes have accustomed to the warm gloom and sharp smell from the real peat fire, a local guide describes the way of life of the ancient folk who lived here. Afterwards, there is a chance to explore the small graveyard nearby and go for a stroll on the wide beach of fine white sand with its gorgeous views out to the turquoise blue Atlantic. The house you can see at Bostadh today is a replica based on houses that were found in 1992 and later backfilled to protect the site.

 

Is this tour right for you?

IS THIS TOUR RIGHT FOR YOU? Due to the grassy, sandy, uneven and sloping ground encountered, this tour is not suitable for guests with limited mobility or wheelchair users. The scenic drive to and from Bostadh will take approximately one hour each way. A small number of people are permitted inside the Iron Age house at once, so the group will be split with the remaining participants exploring the beach while waiting. It is not always possible to go inside the Iron Age House – in which case the visit will be external only. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets. 

 


Deserted Village of Bostadh

BOSTADT SANDS & IRON AGE HOUSE - TOUR C

  • Discover the impressive Bostadh Iron Age House
  • Admire the ancient dwelling and learn about their way of life
Price£45.00 - £55.00
DurationApprox. 3 hrs
LimitationVery limited capacity
Walking level 2 - moderate walkingModerate walking

Explore a remote but beautiful part of North Lewis, and enjoy glorious views of golden beaches as well as a unique chance to visit an Iron Age house that has been reconstructed.

Starting out from Stornoway, you drive to the Island of Great Bernera, which is joined to the main island by a narrow bridge. It is a rocky island, dotted with lochans, fringed by a few small lobster fishing settlements, owned by the Queen’s former herald.

The coach will drop you close to the deserted village of Bostadh. Gale force winds revealed an entire Iron Age settlement here in 1992, perched above a bay of golden sand. One of the ancient dwellings has now been completely restored – the Iron Age House. Inside, once your eyes have accustomed to the warm gloom and sharp smell from the real peat fire, a local guide describes the way of life of the ancient folk who lived here. Afterwards, there is a chance to explore the small graveyard nearby and go for a stroll on the wide beach of fine white sand with its gorgeous views out to the turquoise blue Atlantic.

DESCRIPTION CORRECT FOR 2015 SCANDINAVIA & BALTIC SEASON

Is this tour right for you?

TOUR NOTES: Due to the grassy, sandy, uneven and sloping ground encountered, this tour is not suitable for guests with limited mobility or wheelchair users. The scenic drive to and from Bostadh will take approximately one hour each way. A small number of people are permitted inside the Iron Age house at once, so the group will be split with the remaining participants exploring the beach while waiting. It is not always possible to go inside the Iron Age House – in which case the visit will be external only. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets.


Isle of Harris, home of the Harris Tweed

BREATHTAKING HARRIS - A SCENIC TOUR - TOUR B

  • Marvel at the spectacularly varied scenery of Harris, including the barren Lewis peat moor, the mountainous area of Tarbert and the majestic views of Clisham
  • Enjoy time at leisure to discover Tarbert and Horgabost Beach at your own pace
Panoramic Coach Tour
Price£35.00 - £45.00
DurationApprox. 4.75 hrs
LimitationLimited capacity
Walking level 1 - minimal or no walkingMinimal or no walking
Free time includedFree time included
Shopping time includedShopping time included

This largely panoramic tour takes you to picturesque south Lewis and the Isle of Harris, known around the world for its Harris Tweed – a hand woven cloth made from pure new Scottish wool, dyed using indigenous plants.

Leaving Stornoway you travel southwards, skirting the fjord like sea lochs of Loch Erisort and Loch Seaforth, the road climbs steadily past Bowglass and Ardvourlie before traversing a mountain pass with spectacular views of the rugged countryside. You should keep your eyes peeled for red deer, otters and golden eagles. Clisham – at 800 metres (2,600 feet) is the highest mountain in the Outer Isles. Powerful forces of ice and ocean in the distant past have carved and polished a dramatic landscape of stark sea cliffs, sweeping beaches and rugged heather uplands.

Just before reaching Tarbert, you pass the old whaling station of Banamhuinneader. You will stop in Tarbert, the largest village on the Isle of Harris with only 400 occupants, overlooking Loch Tarbert. Now passing through a dramatic lunar landscape of rocks dotted with tiny lochans (small lakes), descend to the vast expanse of Luskentyre Bay, pausing at Horgabost Beach - a strand of bleached white sand that enticingly fills the entire bay, washed by turquoise sea and backed by steep dunes. All this is set against a backdrop of mountains to the north and the beautiful uninhabited island of Taransay – location for the BBC’s experimental reality TV programme, Castaway, when a group of people were left to live on the island for a year, fending for themselves.

DESCRIPTION CORRECT FOR 2015 SCANDINAVIA & BALTIC CRUISES

Is this tour right for you?

TOUR NOTES: You will have some free time in Tarbert, where there is a small range of shops and at Horgabost Beach - there are toilet facilities at each. The sighting of wildlife can not be guaranteed. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets.


Horgabost Beach, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis

Breathtaking Harris: A Scenic Tour

  • Marvel at the spectacularly varied scenery of Harris
  • Including the barren Lewis peat moor, the mountainous area of Tarbert and the majestic views of Clisham
  • Enjoy time at leisure to discover Tarbert and Horgabost Beach at your own pace
Price£40.00-£50.00
DurationApproximately 4 1/4 hours
Walking level 1 - minimal or no walkingMinimal or no walking
Free time includedFree time included
Shopping time includedShopping time included

This largely panoramic tour takes you to picturesque south Lewis and the Isle of Harris, known around the world for its Harris Tweed – a hand woven cloth made from pure new Scottish wool, dyed using indigenous plants.

Leaving Stornoway you travel southwards, skirting the fjord like sea lochs of Loch Erisort and Loch Seaforth, the road climbs steadily past Bowglass and Ardvourlie before traversing a mountain pass with spectacular views of the rugged countryside. You should keep your eyes peeled for red deer, otters and golden eagles. Clisham – at 800 metres (2,600 feet) is the highest mountain in the Outer Isles. Powerful forces of ice and ocean in the distant past have carved and polished a dramatic landscape of stark sea cliffs, sweeping beaches and rugged heather uplands.

Just before reaching Tarbert, you pass the old whaling station of Banamhuinneader. You will stop in Tarbert, the largest village on the Isle of Harris with only 400 occupants, overlooking Loch Tarbert. Now passing through a dramatic lunar landscape of rocks dotted with tiny lochans (small lakes), descend to the vast expanse of Luskentyre Bay, pausing at Horgabost Beach - a strand of bleached white sand that enticingly fills the entire bay, washed by turquoise sea and backed by steep dunes. All this is set against a backdrop of mountains to the north and the beautiful uninhabited island of Taransay – location for the BBC’s experimental reality TV programme, Castaway, when a group of people were left to live on the island for a year, fending for themselves.

 

Is this tour right for you?

IS THIS TOUR RIGHT FOR YOU? You will have some free time in Tarbert, where there is a small range of shops and at Horgabost Beach - there are toilet facilities at each. The sighting of wildlife can not be guaranteed. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets.


Harris Tweed, Isle of Lewis

Harris Tweed

  • Learn how the Harris Tweed is made
  • Enjoy some time at leisure in Tarbert
Price£60.00-£70.00
DurationApproximately 3 1/2 hours
Walking level 1 - minimal or no walkingMinimal or no walking
Free time includedFree time included
Shopping time includedShopping time included

This scenic tour allows you to admire the beauty of the fascinating geography of the glorious Hebridean Isles and learn how the famous Harris Tweed is made.

Leaving Stornoway, travel south along the wonderful scenic and mountainous roads to the southern Isle of Harris and its capital port town of Tarbert. The narrow road winds around stunning lochs and between craggy mountains offering you fantastic panoramas before the scenery changes to views of stunning beaches.

Harris Tweed is one of the most desirable woollen textiles in the world and is produced in the Outer Hebrides, woven on hand looms in the weavers’ own homes. You will visit a small tweed workshop for a demonstration of spinning and weaving this beautiful, classic product. After the visit, you will have some time at leisure in Tarbert - the largest village on Harris - to explore and maybe do a spot of island shopping before returning to your ship in Stornoway.

 

Is this tour right for you?

IS THIS TOUR RIGHT FOR YOU? The amount of walking undertaken during this tour is at guests own discretion. The tweed workshop is considered suitable for wheelchairs.

 


Callanish Standing Stones, Lewis

HISTORIC LEWIS - A HEBRIDEAN ISLAND TOUR - TOUR A

  • Discover a wild, windy and totally unspoilt part of Scotland, whose landscapes range from brilliant blue seas and golden sands to heather-backed mountains
  • Learn about the heartland of Gaelic culture and visit one of the most important pre-historic sites in Scotland
Price£35.00 - £45.00
DurationApprox. 3.25 hrs
LimitationLimited capacity
Walking level 1 - minimal or no walkingMinimal or no walking

Discover the stunningly beautiful Isle of Lewis, the largest of the Hebridean Islands and visit one of the most important prehistoric sites in Scotland, as well as legacies of the earlier crofters.

Leaving Stornoway, the capital of the Outer Hebrides, you cross the typical peat moors of central Lewis. Continue towards the striking west coast and the village of Callanish, to visit the Callanish Standing Stones – rated as the most important of its type in Britain after Stonehenge. These stones date from around 1500 BC, and are laid out in the form of a cross with a circle in the centre. One theory about their purpose is that they were aligned with the moon and the stars to provide a seasonal cycle on which the early Neolithic farmers could depend.

You continue along the beautiful Atlantic coastal road and drive northward to Arnol, where the remains of a few abandoned black houses can be seen. Black houses were built as a combined byre (cowshed), barn and home in the tradition of ancient long houses, where poor folk lived with their animals until as recently as the 1970’s. One building has been restored – the Black House Museum. It has thick walls with a thatched roof, and is complete with homely furnishings and peat fire.

From Arnol your tour finally turns inland again and crosses fairly desolate, open moorland, before reaching Stornoway and the harbour.

DESCRIPTION CORRECT FOR 2015 SCANDINAVIA & BALTIC CRUISES

Is this tour right for you?

TOUR NOTES: There is approximately 30 minutes of walking or standing at each of your stops – Callanish Standing Stones and Arnol Black House. Rough ground will be encountered at each site, however much of the tour (all except part of Arnol Black House) is accessible to wheelchairs. All participants must be able to board the coach unaided. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets. The tour may operate in reverse order.


Callanish Stones, Stornoway

Historic Lewis: A Herbridean Island Tour

  • Discover a wild, windy and totally unspoilt part of Scotland
  • Admire the landscapes that range from brilliant blue seas and golden sands to heather-backed mountains
  • Learn about the heartland of Gaelic culture and visit one of the most important pre-historic sites in Scotland
Price£40.00-£50.00
DurationApproximately 3 1/2 hours
Walking level 2 - moderate walkingModerate walking

Discover the stunningly beautiful Isle of Lewis, the largest of the Hebridean Islands and visit one of the most important prehistoric sites in Scotland, as well as legacies of the earlier crofters.

Leaving Stornoway, the capital of the Outer Hebrides, you cross the typical peat moors of central Lewis. Continue towards the striking west coast and the village of Callanish, to visit the Callanish Standing Stones – rated as the most important of its type in Britain after Stonehenge. These stones date from around 1500 BC, and are laid out in the form of a cross with a circle in the centre. One theory about their purpose is that they were aligned with the moon and the stars to provide a seasonal cycle on which the early Neolithic farmers could depend.

You continue along the beautiful Atlantic coastal road and drive northward to the site of Dun Carloway Pictish Broch, one of the best-preserved Iron Age Brochs in the whole of Scotland. Probably built sometime in the last century BC, it would have served as an occasionally defensible residence for an extended family complete with accommodation for animals at ground floor level. It would also have served as a visible statement of power and status in the local area. Visit today with your guide to complete your picture of ancient Lewis before finally turning inland again and across fairly desolate, open moorland to reach Stornoway and the harbour.

 

Is this tour right for you?

IS THIS TOUR RIGHT FOR YOU? There is approximately 30 minutes of walking or standing at each of your stops – Callanish Standing Stones and Dun Carloway. Rough ground will be encountered at each site. All participants must be able to board the coach unaided. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets. The tour may operate in reverse order. We recommend bringing along some waterproof clothing.

 


Butt of Lewis Lighthouse, Lewis

Journey to the Far North

  • Admire the scenery of Lewis as you head to the northernmost tip
  • Discover delightful Port Ness and the stunning coastal scenery 
Price£50.00-£60.00
DurationApproximately 3 1/2 hours
LimitationVery Limited Capacity
Walking level 1 - minimal or no walkingMinimal or no walking
Free time includedFree time included

Travel to the very north of Lewis, enjoying the scenery and visit the mysterious St Moluag’s Church and the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse.

Travel by coach from Stornoway and across the Isle of Lewis – the route offers splendid views of the unspoilt countryside. You will arrive at Port Ness, or Port Nis, which has the highest percentage of Gaelic speakers in the country, for a short stop to explore the small, picturesque harbour. The harbour entrance is through a gap between a cliff face and a large rocky islet and one end of the harbour merges into an extremely attractive white sand beach. You will also visit the Harbour View Gallery where a local artist’s work is on display.

Continue to the little Church of St Moluag which is unique and beautiful - the church is a very unusual T shape. This site is believed to have been consecrated since St Moluag, a companion of St Columba, built a chapel here in the 500’s. The present building is of unknown age but estimated to have been built between the 1100’s and 1500’s. At the time of the reformation it was said to have been dedicated to St Maelrubha, a healer, and as a result the church had become a centre for pilgrimage by those seeking healing.

The expedition then takes you to the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse, set on the edge of rocky cliffs between 60 and 80 feet high. This is as far north as you can go on the Western Islands - the next stop from here is Iceland. The lighthouse was designed by David and Thomas Stevenson and is built in red brick. The isolated location meant that it was supplied by ship until as recently as 1960. The site is famous for being the windiest place in the UK and is a paradise for bird watchers.

After some free time for bird watching or to take in the beautiful scenery, you rejoin your coach and return to Stornoway.

Is this tour right for you?

IS THIS TOUR RIGHT FOR YOU? Most of the walking on this tour is during free time so at the discretion of the individual. St Moluag’s Church, which you will go inside, is reached by a narrow grassy path of approximately 50 metres. For those wishing to make the most of each stop, there is walking over uneven ground. Please wear comfortable shoes and come dressed for the weather conditions on the day. Guests are advised to bring binoculars if you wish to bird watch - we can not, however, guarantee what birdlife will be seen. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets.


Lews Castle, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis

Lews Castle Walk

  • Admire the picturesque views over Stornoway from the commanding position of Lews Castle
  • Discover coastal paths and prehistoric settlements on a walking tour       
Price£20.00-£30.00
DurationApproximately 3 1/2 hours
Walking level 3 - extensive walkingExtensive walking

Enjoy a circular walking tour to the grounds of Lews Castle, the largest castle in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides. Admire excellent views over Stornoway, the port and the coast as well as discovering evidence of prehistoric settlements around Stornoway.

Begin with a walk along the seafront to admire the delightful fishing boats dancing on the waves before crossing the bridge and following the pathway along the coastline. En route pass grounds that were originally laid out as part of Lews Castle’s formal gardens, built on the foundations of an estate house dating back to 1680. The grazing land was transformed into extensive woodlands, large gardens and a conservatory complex to house a wide range of native and exotic plant species.

Continuing along the coast, you reach a small jetty with fantastic views across the bay to the colourful houses of Stornoway, before the path climbs gently through the forest to the highest point of the Castle grounds. Here on Gallows Hill was where once the town’s gallows stood. From the top you will have an excellent panorama of Stornoway and its surroundings. It is here that you will also find evidence of prehistoric settlements dating back to 4000 BC including the largest number of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments around Stornoway.

 

Is this tour right for you?

IS THIS TOUR RIGHT FOR YOU? Please note that guests will be required to walk for the full duration of this tour, over varying terrains which will also include gentle inclines and steps. We therefore do not recommend this tour to guests with limited mobility or wheelchairs users. Please wear comfortable shoes and come dressed for the weather conditions on the day.

 


Lews Castle, Stornoway

STORNOWAY WALKING TOUR - TOUR E

  • Admire the picturesque views over Stornoway from the commanding position of Lews Castle
  • Discover coastal paths and prehistoric settlements on a walking tour 
Activity Tour
Price£40.00 - £50.00
DurationApprox. 3.5 hrs
LimitationLimited capacity
Walking level 3 - extensive walkingExtensive walking

Enjoy a circular walking tour to the grounds of Lews Castle, the largest castle in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides. Admire excellent views over Stornoway, the port and the coast as well as discovering evidence of prehistoric settlements around Stornoway.

Begin with a walk along the seafront to admire the delightful fishing boats dancing on the waves before crossing the bridge and following the pathway along the coastline. En route pass grounds that were originally laid out as part of Lews Castle’s formal gardens, built on the foundations of an estate house dating back to 1680. The grazing land was transformed into extensive woodlands, large gardens and a conservatory complex to house a wide range of native and exotic plant species.

Continuing along the coast, you reach a small jetty with fantastic views across the bay to the colourful houses of Stornoway, before the path climbs gently through the forest to the highest point of the Castle grounds. Here on Gallows Hill was where once the town’s gallows stood. From the top you will have an excellent panorama of Stornoway and its surroundings. It is here that you will also find evidence of prehistoric settlements dating back to 4000 BC including the largest number of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments around Stornoway.

Finally you will reach the impressive mock Tudor Castle, the lavishly appointed Lews Castle is a Victorian era home built on the back of opium money by the island’s one time owner Sir James Matheson. During the Second World War the house was used as a naval hospital, a period during which the groomed woodlands fell into a wild state and the fantastic glasshouses dilapidated. Today unfortunately the castle is in a ruinous state however Stornoway Trust is working on major improvements to return the building to its former glory.

DESCRIPTION CORRECT FOR 2015 SCANDINAVIA & BALTIC CRUISES

Is this tour right for you?

TOUR NOTES: Please note that guests will be required to walk for the full duration of this tour, over varying terrains which will also include gentle inclines and steps. We therefore do not recommend this tour to guests with limited mobility or wheelchairs users. Please wear comfortable shoes and come dressed for the weather conditions on the day.


Callanish Stones, Stornoway

Wonders of the Western Isles

  • Discover the prehistoric remains of the Callanish Stones
  • Explore the remote coastal settlement of Arnol Blackhouse and learn about the island’s history
Price£45.00-£60.00
DurationApproximately 3 1/2 hours
Walking level 2 - moderate walkingModerate walking
Free time includedFree time included

Journey to the western part of the stunningly beautiful Isle of Lewis, largest of the Western Islands, an area that features vast landscapes of peat moors, the island’s best prehistoric remains at Callanish and the fantastically restored crofting farm of Arnol Blackhouse.

You will be in the heart of Gaelic culture, giving you a feeling of travelling back in time to a land of people pursuing long-standing traditions like crofting, fishing and weaving.

Leaving Stornoway, the capital of the Outer Hebrides, cross the typical peat moors of central Lewis. You then continue towards the striking west coast and the village of Callanish, to visit the Callanish Standing Stones – rated as the most important in Britain after Stonehenge. These stones date from around 1500 BC, and are laid out in the form of a cross with a circle in the centre. One theory about their purpose is that they were aligned with the moon and the stars to provide a seasonal cycle on which the early Neolithic farmers could depend.

You continue along the beautiful Atlantic coastal road and drive northward to the site of Dun Carloway Pictish Broch, one of the best-preserved Iron Age Brochs in the whole of Scotland. Probably built sometime in the last century BC, it would have served as an occasionally defensible residence for an extended family complete with accommodation for animals at ground floor level. It would also have served as a visible statement of power and status in the local area.

Back on your coach and along the Atlantic coastal road, you continue to the beautifully remote coastal settlement of the Black House of Arnol – a fully furnished island croft (small farm) complete with attached byre and stockyard.  The house has very thick walls and a thatched roof, and a peat fire burns in the grate and you can see how the islanders used to live – crofting life as it was until only 50 years ago.  In fascinating contrast, the site is also home to a white house, furnished as it was in the 1920s and representing the world into which the black house residents moved.

From here your tour finally turns inland again and crosses fairly desolate, open moorland, before reaching Stornoway and your awaiting ship.

 

Is this tour right for you?

IS THIS TOUR RIGHT FOR YOU? There is approximately 45 minutes of walking or standing at both Callanish and Arnol Blackhouse and 20 minutes at Dun Carloway. Uneven ground will be encountered at each site. All participants must be able to board the coach unaided. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets. The tour may operate in reverse order. 

 


Gearrannan settlement, Lewis

WONDERS OF THE WESTERN ISLES - TOUR D

  • Discover the prehistoric remains of the Callanish Stones
  • Explore the remote coastal settlement of Gearrannan and learn about the island’s history
Price£45.00 - £55.00
DurationApprox. 3.75 hrs
LimitationLimited capacity
Walking level 2 - moderate walkingModerate walking
Free time includedFree time included

Journey to the western part of the stunningly beautiful Isle of Lewis, largest of the Western Islands, an area that features vast landscapes of peat moors, the island’s best prehistoric remains at Callanish and the fantastically restored crofting village of Gearrannan.

You will be in the heart of Gaelic culture, giving you a feeling of travelling back in time to a land of people pursuing long-standing traditions like crofting, fishing and weaving.

Leaving Stornoway, the capital of the Outer Hebrides, cross the typical peat moors of central Lewis. You then continue towards the striking west coast and the village of Callanish, to visit the Callanish Standing Stones – rated as the most important in Britain after Stonehenge. These stones date from around 1500 BC, and are laid out in the form of a cross with a circle in the centre. One theory about their purpose is that they were aligned with the moon and the stars to provide a seasonal cycle on which the early Neolithic farmers could depend.

Continue along the beautiful Atlantic coastal road to the beautifully remote coastal settlement of Gearrannan. Walking through the restored village of typical blackhouses on the edge of the ocean is like a journey through time in a quaint and tranquil atmosphere. Here you will have an introductory talk, by a local guide, on the village and island history, followed by a weaving demonstration. Enjoy a little free time to discover more in the resource centre, or to stretch your legs in the village itself.

From here your tour finally turns inland again and crosses fairly desolate, open moorland, before reaching Stornoway and your awaiting ship.

DESCRIPTION CORRECT FOR 2015 SCANDINAVIA & BALTIC CRUISES

Is this tour right for you?

TOUR NOTES: There is approximately 45 minutes of walking or standing at both Callanish and Gearrannan village. Uneven ground will be encountered at each site, however much of the tour (all except part of the Blackhouses Museum) is accessible to wheelchairs. All participants must be able to board the coach unaided. The quality of buses and the local road infrastructure are not comparable to mainland Scotland. Buses – which are often used for school runs as well as executive tours – do not usually have air conditioning or toilets. The tour may operate in reverse order. 


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